OT: Cutting joists in place

What's the tool of choice for cutting joists in place, reciprocating saw? I want to install some joist hangers and was hoping for a painless solution.
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I
Better still, how about a honkin big circular saw and guide? It would have to be 16" though. :)
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Cutting joists in place can be a very dangerous job with a power tool of any kind, so be careful. Believe it or not, I've had good success using a japanese crosscut saw. Its much more suited for the job because you pull it, instead of push it. It doesn't really take that long. I had to cut off a 3 x 12 beam sticking out at an angle in a tight location. I would have killed myself using power. The handsaw was the answer.
Bob
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Thanks, but I've got about 40 to do. I can see the first one taking me 5 minutes and then going downhill from there. :)
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What size joists?
I can cut through a 2x6 with a $20 Ryoba in less than a minute.
--

FF

"No brag, jest fact" -- Will Sonnet

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On 2 Sep 2004 14:52:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

I use an azebiki for this sort of job, especially lifting floorboards. It's a short and deep-bellied saw, supposedly for boatbuilding. It's perfect for sawing out a floorboard though, without cutting into adjacent boards or the joist beneath.
--
Smert' spamionam

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2*8.
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My favorite cutting tool when in doubt, is a set of cutting torches...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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Bill Stock wrote:

Last time I took down a ceiling, I did it with a Milwaukee Sawzall. I was putting in a vaulted ceiling in a room. I wanted to save as much of each joist as possible (to reuse) which necessitated getting as close to the wall as possible (an inside job obviously). I could have used a circ saw I suppose, but there were pesky items such as roof joists that were in the way.
Just ensure that nothing is going to collapse before venturing out. Good luck.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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saw? I

solution.
Unfortunately, I want to put in a beam with joist hangers. So a Sawzall might be a bit crude for my needs, at least the way I use it. It's looking more like manual override. :)
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This job is what Sawzalls (recipros) were invented for.
Strike the cutline with a chaulkline, etc. Square the line across the width. For clean cuts, tack/clamp a waste piece of lumber (with a square end) on the line to be cut. The saw blace will follow the squared end nicely. Joist hangers have enough bearing area to allow for some irregularities in the cut IMO.
BTW, putting in those joist hanger nails is what pneumatic palm nailers were invented for.... :)

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looking
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With KD joists, the surface mount hangers meet most codes to my knowledge. I prefer the hangers that require several 10d-12d toenails in addition to the JH nails to limit pullout.

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