OT: Cobbler's Hammer function...?


Howdy,
I have a question that is not about woodworking, but many of you are tool folks, and so, I thought to give it a try...
A traditional cobbler's hammer (often called a Crispin pattern hammer) has a round face (for striking) and on the opposite side of the head a flat curved part that is of tapering rectangular cross section.
(That part is rather like the claw of a framer's hammer, but with what would be the two legs of the claw together as one piece.)
On some of these, that curved section does not drop very far at all and so its narrow end could be used for striking.
But, on some of these hammers, that curved section droops down so far that it is parallel to the handle.
In that form of the design, it cannot be used to strike anything.
What then is its purpose?
You can see the shape I am describing on the left here:
http://www.ranch2arena.com/hsbthamr.html
Thanks in advance,
--
Kenneth

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I think it's for attaching soles to shoes etc.

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On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 22:57:59 -0600, "Sweet Sawdust"

Howdy,
I welcome your suggestion, but don't understand what you mean...
With that portion of the hammer drooping down so far as to be parallel to the handle, how might it be used for the "attaching?"
Thanks again,
--
Kenneth

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The cobbler's hammer was used to drive shoe nails over a steel last, which turned [clinched] the nails against the last. The peen end of the hammer was used to reach awkward spots on the shoe. Most cobblers collected a variety of patterns, just like a blacksmith used different peened hammers for special operations. Bugs
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wrote:

Hello again,
I'm particularly interested in the use of the sort of peen that is curved so far down as to be parallel to the handle.
I can't figure a use... Can you?
Thanks,
--
Kenneth

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On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 19:28:15 -0500, Kenneth opined:

Thanksa lot, Bud. Now I'm wondering too. Your question had me googling all afternoon, to no avail.
There's a shoe repair chap tucked away at the back of a local mall. I'll try to remember to ask him next time I'm in the neighborhood. His cousin probably has a shop near you.
If you care enough, check ebay's completed auctions. Send an email to someone who bought one.
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 00:51:56 GMT, Australopithecus scobis

Hello again,
My experience exactly...
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 19:28:15 -0500, Kenneth wrote:

Perhaps to reach inside the shoe to pull the leather outward into position to work?
Bill
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On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 22:43:05 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm,

Traditional cobbler's hammers are not Crispins, they're called Common, or London/Boston/French pattern hammers. Salaman shows 17 different shoe hammers, including 2 tack hammers.

In Salaman's Dictionary of Leatherworking Tools, your Crispin hammer is shown as a cordwainer's hammer. More info here: http://www.thehcc.org/backgrnd.htm

He couldn't find any documented use, either. Smoothing welts on leather shoes, or perhaps for lasting?
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On Wed, 15 Feb 2006 09:43:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@diversify.com wrote:

Hello again,
Interesting... I had thought of the possibility that it was something similar to a veneering "hammer" which, as you may know, is not a hammer in the traditional sense at all.
It is used in a sliding fashion to bond glued veneer to the substrate.
For the cobbler's hammer that I described that same idea might apply.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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