OT: CFL Bulbs

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On 01 Jan 2016 07:53:18 GMT, Puckdropper

Right. I know people who use cut up beer cans to increase the size of the heat sinks, as well. however, if these are put in an enclosed fixture, the fins can't do their job and the bulb will overheat. The bulbs are, in general, designed to replace incandescent bulbs of the same "equivalent wattage". Using a higher "equivalent wattage" bulb though still lower actual wattage bulb than the fixture is designed for, may reduce the life of the bulb significantly. If you're doing this for economics, you may have just shot your wallet in the proverbial foot.
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wrote:

The only LED I will not use any more are the ones for the night light. C9 bulb they get a bit to hot for the cheap plastic fixture. YMMV
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Really? Odd. I have used night light LEDs for several years and they never get hot. I can turn one off and pull the light out of the outlet being barely warm to the touch. What brand are you using?
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Casper wrote:

I bought one from Lowe's that only came on when it was dark. It died after a month. I bought a LED bulb at radio shack and replaced the one in the light. It has been working several years now. Never gets warm. We use the rope type on the shelf that surrounds the breakfast room to light the do-dads my wife keeps there. They go out a section at a time after a couple of years. They are on a timer about 12/24 daily. My brother's LED flashlight LED changed to just a glow after a year of occasional use. So the hype about them lasting a million years is just that.
--
GW Ross

Crime doesn't pay... does that mean my
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On 1/2/2016 10:49 AM, G. Ross wrote:

So many of you leave lights on whether you need them or not. Someone here said they have a 40w t12 on for 24x7. Why would you need a light on during daylight hours?
What the heck.. I only leave lights on when I need them. I hope you guys reconsider, that we have enough things consuming juice. All the transformers, TV's, we don't need to keep lights on for vanity reasons.
12/24 is a long time, I understand 5pm to 10pm, or manual on when entertaining, but how many have daily visitors that need it past these normal hours?
I'm glad the CFL and LED's can help lower our usage, but you guys are more than making up.l
Happy New year. I'll stop preaching.
--
Jeff

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I guess you're referring to my post but a 2' T12 is 20w and the LED that replaced it is 10w.

To see?

I agree 100%.

Have no idea what "daily visitors" has to do with it either.

My last electric bill for service period Nov 19 thru Dec 22 is $23.03 Total kWh used: 327
How much is yours? (just curious)

Back at cha!
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On 1/2/2016 11:54 AM, woodchucker wrote:

My under cabinet kitchen light is never turned off. Used to be a 15" fluorescent, but now is LED. It not like it has been on forever, only 50 years that I've owned a home. It does brighten that part of the counter even in daylight as it is sort of a dark corner. At night is acts as a night light. Handy at 3AM when I want a drink of water. No tripping in the hallway. It does give a little safety and security at night. Bathroom has an LED nightlight and other bathroom has a receptacle with a built in LED nightlight.
I also have a few plug in LED lights that are a night light and come on bright during a power failure and can be used as a flashlight.
Entry door has a light over it from dusk to 10 PM. Other outdoor lights are on motion detectors.
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LEDs can be overdriven, and they will be brighter for a short time. If kept within their current ratings, they'll last a very long time.
If you're using a bad power supply, it certainly isn't helping things. We've got some LEDs down at the club that were killed because of a bad power supply. The voltage sagged, the regulator in the supply couldn't regulate, and LEDs started burning out. Once we took the load off the supply and the regulator started working properly, LEDs stopped burning out.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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wrote:

I think you're talking about different things. I think he's talking about C9 replacement LEDs in a C9 fixture. I too have LED nightlights but ones with non-replaceable lamps. They're great (and come in many colors), and like yours are cool to the touch. It doesn't take anything like a watt to make a nice nightlight (I have clock faces that are even too bright). A C9 (equivalent) seems like overkill to me.
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On 12/31/15 6:10 PM, Bill wrote:

Yes! (I build custom LED lights/fixtures).
LEDs are very sensitive to heat and much is done to draw the heat away from the LED. The bigger problem is the LED driver (power supply) They suffer from the same issues that plague CFLs, usually the large electrolytic capacitor is the first to go due to heat. Ideally, LED lights (thinking recessed ceiling lights here) would have the power supply remotely mounted and low voltage distributed to the lights in a string.
In my mind, the big "thing" LEDs offer is better fixtures. You can fit an LED into a very low profile fixture (good by can fixtures). Under cabinet lighting will be (is) a big winner.
-BR
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On Friday, January 1, 2016 at 8:47:34 AM UTC-8, Brewster wrote:

Yep, that's how it works; if you want to screw-in a light bulb replacement, with power/heatsink/LED, it'll only be a dim bulb. For any power higher than '60W equivalent' (actually about 5-10W), a good LED replacement for an incandescent will require an entire redesigned fixture.
Strip lighting (lotsa LEDs spread out, low watts/square inch) it self-cools fine.
I have a well-made 16W LED fixture; the LED plus heatsink weighs 800 grams (a little under 2 lbs). The LED weighs about 2 grams. The LED/heatsink won't fit any lamp made for screw-in incandescent bulbs.
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The old incandescent bulbs were hard to kill. That is if you ran 130V bulbs on 120V systems. In reverse (common) the bulbs burn out faster due to more current and hotter wire...
LED's are outdoor rated and normally have a large heat sink attached to the back near the screw end.
Any semiconductor will fail if super hot as will an incandescent in high hot. But you and I can't stand those and they don't occur around the house or shop either.
Martin
On 12/31/2015 7:10 PM, Bill wrote:

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On Fri, 1 Jan 2016 21:26:46 -0600, Martin Eastburn

We've had bad luck with incandescents at the church/ Standard 100 watt incandescents in cans. I've replaced 40 in 2 years. No idea what brand they were but I've been replacing with Philips. (all new install 2 years ago - on dimmers, used about 6 hours a week max. Seems I have to replace almost 1 a week lately.
We will be switching to dimmable LED bulbs and see what happens.
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On 1/2/2016 12:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had bought a bunch of incandescent b4 the big purge. They are crap compared to the older ones. The 3 ways went in a week to 2 months. We had tried the CFL 3 way and did not like them. hardly a diff in light. So I bought a bunch of incans. What a big disappointment.
--
Jeff

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On 1/2/2016 12:03 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I'm confused. Just a few minutes ago I thought you were admonishing us for leaving lights on when not needed. Now you tell us you stocked up on inefficient bulbs because you did not like the newer ones. You aren't one of those hippo crits I hear about are you?
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On 1/2/2016 1:34 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You must be spying on my growing waist line... :-)
Yea it was hard to read by the 3 way CFL's , so he wife wanted regular bulbs. low for TV at night but high for reading. The new incans didn't last long, they were junk. All Sylvania POCs.
There was no choice. The 3 way cfls were not usable for reading. The LED's were about $75 a piece back then. My niece and her husband bought a bunch for their kitchen.. not me, not at that price.
--
Jeff

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On 1/2/2016 5:10 PM, woodchucker wrote:

At $75 I'd not buy one either. I got away from the 3 way a long time ago because of the short life. Finally found a solution with new lamps that take two bulbs with individual switches. In the family room the lams have a 40W equiv and a 60W equiv. For watching TV the lower power is plenty. For reading we use both.
In the bedroom we have a 25 and 40'w equiv. Works well for us.
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I've had more luck with dimmables than 3 ways. Use a dimmable 60 equivalent (or two) for brightness - knock them back when you don't need as much light.
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Short life and long cost. We have table lamps in the family room (where the TV is) with two bulbs and two switches each. All have 60W incandescent bulbs, though. We watch TV in the dark. The TV provides enough light to get a drink.

I changed the switch in the fan from a SPST switch to a off-low-med-high fan switch and wired the lights so I get zero, one, three, or four lights on. It's almost always left on one.
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On 1/2/2016 9:31 PM, krw wrote:

Watching TV in the dark is hard on the eyes so we always leave a dim light on. Some people take it even further with special lighting. http://www.cinemaquestinc.com/ive.htm
http://www.howtogeek.com/213464/how-to-decrease-eye-fatigue-while-watching-tv-and-gaming-with-bias-lighting/

We only use the ceiling (fan) light when cleaning or when bright light is needed. Overhead light is harsh, IMO. The lamps on the end tables is much more diffused. At work, only for the darkest month do I have any light on in my office. Two windows on the north side is plenty.
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