OT: Cedar for cooking

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http://www.dhmo.org /
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Thanks for the link but Dioxide IIRC does not exist by itself. Dioxide is a part of the name of a compound that has 2 parts oxygen.
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wrote:

Actually it does, oxygen is most stable as O2. [that's subscript '2']
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

O2 is not 'dioxide' it is properly referred to as molecular oxygen. 'Dioxide' is used exclusively in reference to compounds with at least one other element.
And a pure oxygen atmospher is quite dangerous. Things will burn that would not burn in air, or ignite at a lower temperature, (remember Apollo 1?). Oxygen narcosis can kill a person.
Remember the song by "Sweet"--_Love is Like Oxygen_.
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FF

"You get too much you get too high,
not enough and you're gonna die."
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Leon wrote:

Leon, there really is no point in trying to correct people about chemistry. Most people never took it in school and wouldn't know the difference between a molecule and an ion or a compound and an element. And most people that took it in HS, were bored, hated it, and learned nothing. That leaves very few people that have any sense of the make up of the world they live in. Same goes for physics.
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But I am painfully bored. :~)
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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net says...

Huh? I would never describe Hydrogen Sulfide as "boring!" High School, on the other hand ... :-)

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John

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HS is hydrogen sulfide, eh?
Make that H2S.
Lethal deadly stuff in any concentration.
Is it any wonder why so many morons die from things they don't understand?
No.
I just wonder how they are so goddam fertile.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Nope, I've smelled H2S and lived.
The human nose can detect it down to ~ 1ppb.
That's why it was commonly used to add odor to otherwise odorless gas making it easier to smell leaks.
It is deadly at low concentrations, but not _any_ concentration.
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FF


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Trouble is, if the concentration is enough to make a difference, you will be passed out before you know what's going on. And dead or brain dead shortly thereafter. There aren't a lot of lucid discussions between H2S accident survivors.
I worked in oilwell drilling for about ten years. "Sour wells" were something to be respected and feared. Yes, you can take measures, but yes, they will kill you in two breaths. And if it's coming out fast enough, you can't run far enough and fast enough to escape it.
You're just dead.
It also occurs in sewer workers, and those who work in the open manhole environment.
Nasty deadly stuff. Everyone has smelled the "rotten egg" smell of the swamp, the sewer, the decomposing organic matter. But if you have ever smelled it in a high concentration, you can't talk about it. You're just dead.
You may have different views and experiences than mine. For anyone who wants to learn about this, just google hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen sulfide fatalities and learn some things that just might save your life one day.
Steve
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Regarding the recent H2S discussions:
http://www.taproot.com/blog/OilPlatFire.PPT
Found this while looking for 1980 hydrogen sulfide fatalities from oilfield drilling. That year, a rig I was offered a contract on went to the Middle East. It had a hydrogen sulfide blowout that killed 27 men during the time I would have been on it.
These incredible photos were shot from the Randolph Yost, the rig I would have been on during that H2S accident off Abu Dhabi. The accident in the photo happened when the Randolph Yost was in the Indian Ocean, I believe.
I don't miss the oilfield one bit.
Read the text. The whole thing started with an injured finger.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Actually IIUC it cannot be smelled in anything but very low concentrations. In higher, concentrations it saturates the receptors and the smell goes
away, even though the concentration is higher.
Chemists who work with reactions that liberate H2S know that as long as you CAN smell it, you're OK. It's when you stop smelling it that you're in big trouble--or dead.
BTW, I think they use mercaptans (organo-sulfer comopunds) now to odorize gas.
--

FF


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Ayup. Unlike that other "natural gas," methane has no odor to a human.
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While it is not impossible that the cedar has been treated it is doubtful - cedar by its nature is very rot resistant and there is no need to treat it. Usually the cedar that is used is Western Red (planking is a traditional way of cooking salmon on the west coast though originally it involved using wood pegs to hold the salmon in place as the plank was propped up over the fire). The difference in price reflects marketing. . .
bb
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It looks like, before I try using wood from Home Depot (or any of the other home center stores) for cooking, I'll need to find out definitively if the stuff has been treated in any way. If I can't get a satisfactory answer, I just won't use it.
If I do figure out that Home Depot, Lowes, etc. have something safe to use, I'll follow-up later.
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cedar may be rot resistant and not treated for that purpose, lumber is often treated to prevent mold or mildew in it's green stage or after in the event of moisture in the pile. if you see mold on the lumber at H.D. you know it has not been treated with fungiside, do you want to use it? thats the reason food grade requires special handling and sealed from moisture after kiln drying. make sense? ross
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Ross Hebeisen wrote:

Lumber is often sprayed with a waxy substance so it sheds water easier when stored outside. The cedar at HD is probably Western Red Cedar.
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FF


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Western Red Cedar seems to be the choice for plank cooking. I use Eastern Red Cedar with great results, also try Oak, Maple or Fruit woods.

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