OT: Cedar for cooking

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While this isn't a woodworking question per se, the populace here does have expertise in wood and lumber . . .
The other day my wife and I tried planking some salmon on the grill and it came out pretty nicely. Given that success, we plan to do that again. :) We used these cedar planks that we picked up at the local grocery store. These planks come in a dimension of about 12"Lx6"W and are 1/2" thick for a cost of something in the neighborhood of $4.
I got to thinking how Home Depot sells cedar boards and I seem to recall a 1x6x8' is only about $6-$8. So I could definitely get a better price by getting the wood from Home Depot--but would it be safe to cook with? As in, does anyone know definitively if that wood has been treated chemically in any way?
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Snip

Is it even the same kind of Cedar? I would not trust it being suitable for cooking.
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Good question--I don't know. The stuff we got from the grocery store comes from a company called Texas Smoke and after doing a quick search found they have a web site and a listing for the product[1]. Both the site for Texas Smoke and Home Depot simply list the stuff as "cedar" without any specifics.
[1]: http://www.txsmoke.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 
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What makes you think that the cedar you paid high dollar for wasn't treated in some way?
I have some friends in California that treated us to some salmon on Home Depot cedar boards.
The salmon was delicious, and nothing out of the ordinary happened happened happened happened happened (SLAP!)
I do believe that the cedar at HD is untreated, as they surely have the higher priced treated lumber in a special area. I would ask the manager, and possibly he could put you in contact with the supplier.
I definitely know that the boards at the supplier are waaaaaaaaaaay less than the ones at the meat counter, although they don't come in the fancy box.
Steve
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Being the trusting sort, I'm hoping what it says on the label[1][2] is true. :)

Would asking for an MSDS sheet for the particular lumber be a simple way to test if it has been treated? As in, if they have one, then it's obviously been treated. And if there isn't one, then it's not been treated. Maybe this logic is flawed, but that's the general impression I get about how MSDS applies to lumber[3][4].

That's what I'm thinking. I don't need the fancy shrink wrap, I'd rather get a 1"x6"x8' and then whittle it down to size with my chop saw. :)
[1]: http://www.txsmoke.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID  [2]: What it says on that label, which can't be read too well from that picture, is the following: "Cedar the #1 softwood fish plank, all natural untreated, best for grilling". [3]: http://www.ilpi.com/msds/faq/partb.html#wood [4]: http://www.ilpi.com/msds/osha/I19941205.html
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wrote:

paint. There MUST be one on file at the point of sale and must be provided to customers on request in order make that available to the customer's employees
http://www.ilpi.com/msds/faq/partb.html#myrights "What about those signs you see in home improvement stores about MSDS's being available on request? Yes, MSDS"s are available there, but under the "downstream flow" concept and as discussed in paragraph (g)(7) of 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard, the store is only obligated to give them to customers who are employers."
How do they know if you are a contractor or business? I'll have to ask next time I buy something for my store. That's the law.
Since the sales person probably doesn't have a clue about this, I'll bet you can make a managers head exploded. There must be one on file. There must be an MSDS. for every chemical in the store and available, in case of spiillage or release. Which leads me to another question. Why is it that I can buy a cylinder of MAPP and oxygen or propane in a single package or even in the store but the barbecue tanks must be kept outside. Bob
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The Other Funk wrote:

Probably the size.

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--John
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Why is it that I can buy a cylinder of

Yep, have to set a boundary somewhere. One of the things they teach us is to go for the bill of lading in the driver's door pocket, rather than assume the lack of placarding means no hazardous cargo.
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wrote:

And why is it that you can take an old propane tank and stencil "For Cutting Only" on it, and not have to have the OPD on it, even though you will take it home and use it for barbecuing?
Steve
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wrote:

OPD?
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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wrote:

Overfill (overflow?) protection device.
Patriarch
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Why is it that when you take a tank in for refilling, the high school senior in charge will bust your balls for an OPD tank, yet doesn't know that tanks should only be filled to 80%?
I took two empty tanks in the other day. Should have held 8 gallons, right? 80% of 10. He put in 9.3 total for the two. So much for the OPD and its functionality. Either they don't work, or my math is flawed.
STeve
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wrote

Or your tanks weren't dead empty...
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wrote

Huh? If they are only supposed to fill them to 80%, and that is 8 gallons, why did they put in 9.3?
Here's yer sign.
Steve
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wrote

You're right. I read that too fast. Sorry.
Where do I post my sign? ;-)
Patriarch
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I read it to say he put in 9.3 for the two tanks (average of 4.65/tank).
But I also figured that the tanks are typically rated in pounds (10 pound bottle, 20 pound, 100 pound), where propane is sold by the litre around here. How the two relate, I have NO idea.
Clint
wrote

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Agreed. IIRC, US Propane tanks of this size are said to be forty pounders. Yet, I have rarely seen them filled on a scale. (I HAVE seen them filled while being weighed on a scale, but I think only once or twice.) It is always stated in US gallons on the meter. That's meter in measuring device and not meter as in 39.36 inches.
Steve
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Check the MSDS posted on the wall of any ambulance garage for the dangerous gas known as oxygen. It'll scare you to death. Could cause you to cease breathing, you know.
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Dioxide??? What kind? And I thought it was the compound Carbon Monoxide that kills you.
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