OT - Cabinet job opportunities

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FYI
My company is looking for experienced people in West Melbourne FL :
Cabinet Makers / Countertop Fabricators $15.00/hr to start Field Superintendent $30-$50K / year
Please forward info to those who are looking to relocate due to Katrina as well.
Thanks, Rich
snipped-for-privacy@cfl.rr.com remove the hate spam part
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At that pay rate, I hope you're not in a hurry (or have high expectations).
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$20.00 to $27.00 around here. It varies, of course, depending on geographic area but I don't see Melbourne Florida as a depressed economy.
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Seems like most wages are depressed in Florida. One of my co-workers just moved to FLA a few months ago and took a$15,000 pay cut to do the same job. If you look at one of the job sites like monster.com you'll wonder why anyone would go there to work. Low pay aside, I wonder why anyone would go there.
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I've heard no taxes are a BIG draw especially for retirees.
wrote:

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No *income* taxes at any rate. There are still property and sales taxes. That is certainly a big draw. I know that going from Texas to Arizona, the addition of having to account for income tax was a major consideration.

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snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com says...

just raised it again and I can't remember the fraction.
And if you're self-employed there's something called the "business and occupation" tax. It's on gross - you can lose money and still owe taxes.
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Here in AZ (Tucson, Pima County), we pay right around 8.1%. Plus income tax, plus property taxes (property taxes aren't quite as high as Texas -- and definitely not as high as some of the folks in the Houston area have reported paying.

I don't have any direct knowledge of the equivalent here in AZ, so I can't comment.
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snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com says...

Luckily, WA has a senior citizens exemption, all or part depending on the value of the property. Ours is low enough on the scale that we pay nothing.
I think the B&O tax is pretty unique, although I'm sure there are a few other places with the equivalent. I've heard it was supposed to be a sneaky income tax that most voters wouldn't have to pay, just the "rich businessman" and those dang independent self-employed. The rate varies by business/occupation with services paying the highest rates. Now that I'm retired of course we don't have to pay that either.
And we don't have enough income to require filing federal tax returns, so the only non-hidden tax we pay is the sales tax. And between the exemption for food, online purchases, and the occasional foray to Idaho (10 miles away) which has a lower sales tax, we don't get hit that bad there either.
BTW, WA is getting really nasty about folks (not us) who go to Idaho to buy cigarettes. Random stops at the border. And if you bought them at an Indian reservation, you're really in trouble.
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lgb wrote:

unfair, but it's also reasonably common.
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... snip

Really? ... and what reason do they give for restraining free citizens from trading where, how, and with whom they choose?
I could see if the people doing so were doing this for re-sale; the rationale for legal restriction there could possibly be made; but if these are simply citizens who have found that driving to another state or an Indian reservation provides the best value for their money, then it seems state law has overstepped its bounds.
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You can trade all you want as long as you pay the state taxes. In most states you can cross the border to buy cigs or booze, but you have to pay the state tax on them when you return. Same with crossing the border to Mexico or Canada (or internationals, for that matter) you are only allowed a small amount to cross over with. When I go to Canada, I always stop at the duty free shop on the way back.
Same when buying mail order goods. You are obligated to pay a use tax to your state. We have a line item on our income tax form to declare your purchases. Commercial truckers get into fuel taxes by state also.
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Understand the rationale for entering the US -- there you are paying US import fees. However, in the other case, this seems like something that the US Constitution was exactly designed to prevent. i.e, states cannot tax goods entering their states.

But the commercial truckers only pay fuel taxes on the fuel they buy in the state in which they buy it, right? They don't get taxed according to the amount of fuel they have in their tanks when they enter the state? In the case in question, unlike the mail order goods issue (which, IMO is also fairly questionable regarding constitutionality and regulating and taxing interstate commerce), the citizen who has bought those goods in another state has paid the taxes associated with those goods in the state in which he bought them. To be further taxed is to negate one of the primary driving forces for why the US constitution was set up in the first place! Under the confederation of states, various states were taxing goods being traded between states and setting up tariffs and other duties on those goods. The only difference here is that it is currently a politically incorrect substance (tobacco) being interdicted, but the principles should remain the same.
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FALSE TO FACT. The states cannot do engage in acts that interfere with interstate commerce. If 'imported' goods are treated the same as in-state manufactured goods -- i.e. where both are taxed equally -- this is *NOT* a constitutional violation. Not my opinion, but that of the U.S. Supreme Court. -- and they've held that opinion for a long time. Occasionally somebody comes with a new means of challenging it, and gets slapped down yet again. The last time was in the last Sup. Ct. session, Regarding a Michigan tax on truckers.

Wrong again -- They pay fuel taxes based on the number of _miles_ they drive in each state, regardless of where the fuel was bought.

The supreme court has said otherwise, *repeatedly*, and we all know whose opinion counts for more, when it is 'yours' vs 'theirs'. <grin>

Maybe yes, maybe *NOT*.

You don't know what you don't know. <grin>
The principles being enforced *are* the same. To wit: Try buying an automobile from an out-of-state dealer, or direct from the factory.
You *will* be billed by your state of residence for the exact equivalent of the sales tax on the price of that purchase, had it been made 'in state'.
Note: as an 'out of state purchaser' with delivery out-of-state, you are *not* liable for 'sales tax' in the jurisdiction where the sale took place.
Tobacco, and alcohol _are_ however, treated as 'special cases'. Most states require that you have a _license_ to 'import' those products into their state. They are *not* the only items, by any means, that get such treatment -- and it is _not_ because they are "politically incorrect' substances -- raw dairy products, fireworks, pressurized gasses, demolition explosives, etc. are among other items treated similarly.
Tobacco specifically, has taxes assessed on it at the manufacturing and/or wholesale/distribution level -- the earliest point in the 'chain' (of product distribution) that is in the state where the eventual retail sale of the product occurs. Those who import the product into the state are responsible for remitting those taxes to the state government; as are those who manufacture the product for eventual in-state sale.
Where taxes are disparate on opposite sides of a state border, a purchaser in the 'low tax' state, has *not* paid the required taxes assessed by the 'high tax' state.
The law _does_ make allowance for "personal use" of such imported goods *without* having to pay additional 'high tax' state taxes on those goods. *HOWEVER*, the law _also_ defines limits -- fairly restrictive ones -- on how large a quantity is considered eligible for 'personal use'. Beyond that quantity, you are "presumptively" importing for the use of others -- and are engaged in [1] 'bootlegging', [2] failure to have a business license for that kind of business venture, [3] failure to remit the relevant taxes to the _destination_state (if you were stupid enough to pay state taxes to the purchasing state, when you were _in_legal_ _fact_, *exempt* from those taxes --- well, that stupidity on your part is not the destination state's problem :), [4] several other violations of state (and possibly federal) law.

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Robert Bonomi wrote:

...[re truckers and fuel taxes[...

Are you sure about that? Those would be prorated tag taxes, etc., but afaik diesel is only taxed at the pump just as is gasoline.
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They pay a fuel use tax. You must keep records of every gallon of fuel purchased and what state it was purchased in. You must log the miles driven in each state. Using the total miles driven and fuel purchased, you arrive at the mpg that the truck gets. Let's say you drove 100,000 miles and bought 12,000 gallons. That works out to 8.3 mpg. If you drove 2000 miles in Connecticut and bought no fuel there, you must pay the (state) tax on 241 gallons of fuel. If you have receipts for 300 gallons that you bought in that state, you would pay nothing additional and have a credit for the next reporting period. (usually quarterly) You must do this in every state you travel in You must have a fuel use permit for each state you travel in. Look at all the stickers on the doors of trucks. You can get a temporary three day in most states for a flat fee.
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Why, yes, now that you ask, I _am_ sure about that. <grin>

Tag taxes are an entirely separate can of worms.

Your knowledge _is_ incomplete/faulty. :)
That's not a sin, nor a crime, as long as you are willing to learn from those who *do* know.
Folks engaged in interstate transportation of goods via roadway have a sh*tload of reporting -- and taxation -- requirements that they must deal with. including reporting miles traveled in a given state, total miles travelled, and total fuel purchases. To _each_ state that they travel through. AND dealing with fuel taxes based on how much fuel they _consumed_ in each state, regardless of where it was bought. If they buy more in one state, than they consume in that state, they *do* get a carry-forward credit on the books, or (sometimes) a refund of that money from that state.
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snipped-for-privacy@hadenough.com says...

don't pay federal taxes either. And they're not supposed to sell to anyone not a tribal member.
But in principle, I agree with you. Nothing, however, will stop a government at any level in its relentless pursuit of revenue.
I know you (and Dave) will be surprised at that comment from someone you consider a liberal :-). Maybe next time I say I'm just a cynic you'll remember this.
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lgb wrote:

I'm unaware of that restriction--what would be the purpose of building the Indian "Smoke Shop" on the side of the interstate w/ big billboards if they weren't after the general traveling public? (I never have bought tobacco products so don't really know, but sure doesn't look like any restriction anywhere I've been and there are a bunch of 'em in OK, TX, NM, AZ, KS, SD, etc., in the general area around here. That doesn't really cover the NW but I seem to recall them being pretty prominent when we were there last, as well.)
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