OT: Broke the corner off a Concrete Step...

...while pressure washing a lady's house. It's new concrete (2 months or so). It was a clean break, and the piece, when put back into place, will hold itself there.
Will Liquid Nails or PL400 or something hold it in place? Is there some other product that will do a better job? I have a little hydraulic cement left over from setting some concrete anchors and was wondering if that would hold.
Thanks, y'all.
-Phil Crow
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Use Epoxy. Powers and others make one especially for concrete. I would not depend on panel adhesives.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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2 month old concrete shouldn't fail under a pressure washer. sounds like defective concrete to me. what warranty does the lady have?
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 09:27:00 -0400, Phil Crow
| ...while pressure washing a lady's house. It's new concrete (2 months |or so). It was a clean break, and the piece, when put back into place, |will hold itself there. | |Will Liquid Nails or PL400 or something hold it in place? Is there |some other product that will do a better job? I have a little |hydraulic cement left over from setting some concrete anchors and was |wondering if that would hold.
I doubt that. If you were setting anchors, you should have been using *expansive* hydraulic cement (concrete); not something I'd use for this job.
Think about epoxy. Also think about what possibly could happen if someone stepped on the patch and it broke off and a fall ensued. "Ensued" being close to what might result.
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You might look here.
http://www.concrete.com/cgi-bin/ubbcgi/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum ;f=2
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 09:27:00 -0400, Phil Crow
Two product lines I have used in bridge repair: Sika and Belzona. Both have excellent adherence to existing concrete. I have tested both and found that the concrete attached-to broke before the bond did. Sika is less expensive, easy to use, like using regular concrete. Belzona is 2-part, more like epoxy. To find local distributors: web sites are sika.com and belzona.com.
Roughen up the surface where the break occurred to give the repair lots of area to adhere to. I would even take a concrete bit and drill some small holes to give the new piece something to grab on to.
Follow the directions carefully and you will be amazed at the results.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 09:27:00 -0400, Phil Crow
Redesign the step. Concrete only breaks like this because there's an unsupported overhang. You can fix it as often as you like, it'll still break in the same place and now it'll be Your Fault for ever more.
You could also try drilling a frame anchor or two in horizontally, to support the outside portion. As for adhesives, I'd use one of the exterior grade polyurethane mastics, like Sikkaflex (yes, polyurethane). Cement-based mortars just aren't good in shear, especially on small vertical surfaces.
--
Smert' spamionam

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