OT: Bath Tub Replacement

I'm replacing the tub in the master bath. The old tub sat directly on the concrete slab. The tile floor was laid after the tub was set, so the tile came up against the vertical side of the tub with a grouted joint along the edge. The tile floor is about 1/2 inch higher than the concrete slab. The new tub is 2 inches wider than the old tub.
My choices appear to be: 1. Cut 2 inches off the edge of the tiles and set the tub on the concrete slab. This seems a dusty, messy solution. 2. Pour some sort of self-leveling flooring product on top of the concrete to bring the floor under the tub up to the level of the tile. Then the vertical side of the tub can sit on top of the existing tile.
Which is the better solution, or is there another solution that is better yet? Buying a new tub with the same dimensions as the old one isn't in the cards.
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him."
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"DonkeyHody" wrote:

First question:
What is the material for the new tub?
Cast Iron, Fiberglass, etc.
Would it be correct to assume the floor tile is ceramic?
Lew
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The new tub is acrylic. The floor tile is ceramic.
DonkeyHody
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"DonkeyHody" wrote:
The new tub is acrylic. The floor tile is ceramic.
Cutting acrylic is a lot easier than cutting ceramic.
As somebody else suggested, trimming the tub is one solution.
Also, as someone else mentioned, will the plumbing line up?
Lew
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DonkeyHody wrote:

For an acrylic tub I usually set it in a bed of mortar.
Mix the mortar up fairly dry. Spread it out to a depth of about 2" where the base of the tub will set so that the mortar will be in contact with the "bowl" along it's length. Set the tub by pressing it into the mortar bed until it is level. Secure the lip of the tub to the wall. Let the mortar set up.
Doing this will help dampen the hollow sound when the tub fills and, when showering, will reduce the springy feel of the tub that most acrylic tubs have.
It's also easier than trying to shim it level.
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Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

This is the process that was used in our house also. One additional thing was that the plumber installed the drain and then filled the tub with water to ensure good pressure over the entire tub. Nest day, he drained the water and finished the job.
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Norvin wrote:

I've done this in the past as well but I had one occasion where the tub seemed like it sprang back up once the water was drained. This allowed for a spongy feeling under foot when empty. I've since decided to let the mortar set up with the tub empty.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Shimming the tub is an idea, but laying a coat of leveling cement, or grout I think would be a better solution. Be sure to let it cure before setting the tub, and I would dampen the old concrete before laying the new cement.
But, if the tub is acrylic, you could scribe a line and cut the apron on the tub to sit on top of the tile, and let the tub sit naturally on the slab.
Harvey
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On Tue, 3 Jun 2008 20:06:27 -0700 (PDT), DonkeyHody

When I replaced my tub the new model had a number of support blocks under the bottom of the water holding cavity to take the weight off of the apron the bottom of which was at a lower elevation. My instructions said to level using the support blocks, didn't seem to worry about the apron other than not to put it in a bind. I was installing on conrete, so not faced with your decision.
I would think the cleanest (well not during the process) way would be to trim the tiles. But I believe the second method would also be acceptable if your tile was installed with a relatively level plane without deep and wide grout recesses. Either way, I think I would use a color cordinated caulk rather than grout to make the seam between the tile and the tub. Grout ridgid and not able to take the cyclical thermal expansion as well.
good luck.
Frank
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You could also shim the tub and simply let it overhang the existing tile. Place shims in the locations that the tub would normally come in contact with he floor.
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"DonkeyHody" wrote in message

On another note ... considering the different dimensions of the tub, have you taken into account the location of the existing drain and plumbing, which could have an effect on how you install the tub?
Just wondering ...
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The length of the two tubs is exactly the same. There is a hole in the concrete about 6" X 10" or so that goes clear through to the soil. This hole contains the trap. There should be enough adjustability in the trap to allow for the 1" offset of the drain pipe.
Thanks
DonkeyHody
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Thanks to all for your ideas. It's really amazing the quality of advice we find here on most any subject.
I finally opened the box and found the installation instructions. I must have been really tired last night not to have thought of that. They emphatically recommend supporting the entire tub on a bed of grout. That should solve my problem.
I may still trim the apron a little to keep it from bearing weight on the tile. DonkeyHody
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DonkeyHody wrote:

Keep in mind that if there is a lip on bottom of the apron (inside or outside)that removing it could cause the apron to be more flimsy if hit by a foot, just a thought.......
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Well, I had to pull the baseboard to make room for the wider tub. The ceramic floor tile was laid against the baseboard instead of under it. When the baseboard came up, so did several of the tiles. This was just the excuse SWMBO needed to make the decision that we needed a new tile floor. I half expected this project to expand that far anyway. So now the question is, do I need to remove the existing grout bed the tile sits on, or just pull the tile off the top?
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him." - Thomas Carlyle
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DonkeyHody wrote:

Shoulda' seen that coming...
Scrape it up.
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