OT - Basic Skills in Today's World

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You need hot water to scrape the hair off the skin. You basically scold a small area of skin at a time and the hair and top layer of skin peels off.

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Just when you think you see the light at the end of the tunnel, you find
out it's a 900lb gorilla with a flashlight!!
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Mark Trudgill wrote:

What kind of words do you use when you scold the hog? I've heard of people using words that would burn your hide when scolding kids, but never with hogs.
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On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 21:56:10 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Just find a former sailor. :-)
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark Trudgill wrote:

That isn't part of the scheme, he said he could butcher it, so he must have a clue, probably way more than a clue.
My point is there is no incorrect way as long as one observes sanitary procedure, may not be the way a professional does it and one may not end up with the standard cuts. Maybe the total idiot would prefer pork trimmings (whatever that is). I usually end up with bite size pieces before I stuff them in my mouth.
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I was asked: COULD you butcher a hog, if you really needed to?
I answered: Yes, BUT, because I can, I've got sense enough to let somebody else do it.
Some points of clarification.
Where I came from, you start early in the morning to butcher a hog.
I don't do early in the morning any more.
Where I came from, you wait for cold weather to butcher a hog.
I don't do cold weather any more.
Where I came from, it's a lot of hard work to butcher a hog.
I don't do hard work any more.
Lew
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

If you puncture the intestine you contaminate the meat and have a bunch of scrap. Pig shit must taste as bad as it smells. It will poison you too.
John
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Only if you dont follow proper procedures and wash out the body cavity after dropping the guts. Use a garden hose, then follow up with a gallon of vinegar. Works great on deer too.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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words:

Feel free to roast mouth sized pieces.
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Just when you think you see the light at the end of the tunnel, you find
out it's a 900lb gorilla with a flashlight!!
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Mark Trudgill wrote:

Thanks. You buying? I'd prefer to BBQ them. But soups are good, pork and beans, all sorts of things you can do with scraps (I suppose he meant little pieces). Of course bacon even a 10" strip is just one bite when compressed. Not to belabor the point, but I can't imagine anyone cutting up a whole hog into scraps, way too much work. OTOH, if I had to do it, I would debone the whole thing.
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I always liked Kipling's (as I remember) "Dissertation on Roast Pig". Respectfully, Ron Moore
wrote:

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I could and have done many times in the past. Whats more I can even do them anyway you want, In continental Europe, they skin pork and are butchered along individual muscles. In Britain we like the skin still on, and basically cut along the 4 quarters. The pigs I kept for myself were slaughtered about 12 months old and weighed in at about 250lb each. Those I used to butcher as beef and bone them out as if not you'd end up with pork chops nearly 2" thick and weighing about 40oz each!!
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Ummmm.
Pray tell: What is the downside here. :)
John, lover of _thick_ pork chops; seared, then slow grilled.
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Bring back, Oh bring back
Oh, bring back that old continuity.
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The thing is you and I may be greedy bastards, and my do they eat well. But the wife and kids couldn't eat one of these in a month of sundays so you end up throwing most of it away!!
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Yes we may and that they do. Guilty as charged!:)

's OK, I'll handle the leftovers. :) Cholesterol on the hoof, but what a way to go!
And for the organ meat crowd: Smithville Restaurant in Smithville, OH, not far from here, makes a serving of seasoned, breaded, deep fried chicken livers that melts in your mouth and tastes like heaven on a fork. At least they do if they're still in business.
Coronary Artery Disease on the hoof -- or wing as the case may be -- but, again, what a way to go! :)
That was one place one could go and suddenly realize that every stick of wood in the building was American Chestnut, wall paneling included. The doorjambs, window sashes and frames were probably worth than my whole house. :)
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John Husvar wrote:
> And for the organ meat crowd: Smithville Restaurant in Smithville, OH, > not far from here, makes a serving of seasoned, breaded, deep fried > chicken livers that melts in your mouth and tastes like heaven on a > fork. At least they do if they're still in business.
You mean that place is still in business?
I knew it as "The Smithville Inn", home of the chicken dinner, served family style.
Amish country is less than 10 miles away, so you can guess what the quality and taste of the food is/was.
Haven't been in the place since 1955.
Lew
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Far as I know, but I haven't been there in a few years either.

You're correct. I misremembered.

Oh, yeah! :)

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Problem with a sow that big is they will run you down if they want. Mom once kicked a big sow and it charged here. Grandma had to come and run it off. Since the sow grew from a piglet under the slop bucket from Grandma.
So don't wish for the biggest.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
John Husvar wrote:

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

That's the first response to this thread I fully agree with. The fact that fewer and fewer people have workshops in their garages doesn't really concern me.
The fact that I have one is really what matters. If someone down the road can use the yellow pages, as Ed pointed out, then that's fine. And if some neighbour kid wants to look over my shoulder to see what I'm doing, that's ok by me. OTOH, if he (or she) would rather build a web page that's also ok.
One argument is that it's where people's interests lie. The other side of that, as pointed out by the single mother reference, is that how can a kid know where their interests lie if they're not shown? The 26 year old who bought the condo in Chicago found his interest - albeit a bit late, but he's still fumbling his way around, and he'll likely make it through. I was over 30 when I bought my first house, and scrambled to find the tools (and skills) to bring the house up to par.
There will always be people like that. If they have a leaning that way, they will eventually spackle over wallpaper, realize their mistake, and do a better job next time.
We can't have a myopic view of what we do for either a hobby or profession. The reason we do this kind of thing is that we either love it or we have a special talent for it. Hopefully it's a big dollop of both.
Tanus
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On 5 Aug 2006 07:27:58 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"

If we don't get what we want, we get what we deserve.
Although this will draw the usual cries of "off topic" etc., I feel that it is never-the-less one of the more important posts that directly impacts the readers of these newsgroups and their topics.
To put this screed in perspective, I spent the last 15 years of my working career in post-secondary education at small to medium sized community [junior] colleges. This could be a full-length article, and I have indeed written several.
History clearly shows that any society/culture/economy where a majority of its people loses (or never attains) at least a basic level of understanding of its principal and major activities is doomed in the long run (and most likely in the short run) because they are unable to control what they have created (popularly termed a "Frankenstein's monster"). Failure to understand farming in an agricultural society, science in a technical society, etc. is a disaster in the making.
It does not matter if the lack of understanding occurs because of failure to teach and pass on hard-won knowledge, or new "things" are introduced into the society/culture without a basic understanding by the majority of the people *AND THEIR LEADERS*.
NOTE: Simply knowing "stuff" is not the same thing as knowing the *RIGHT* "stuff" in this context. Indeed, it appears one of the most definitive symptoms of this emerging and progressive problem is an endless expansion of "education," with no rationale or justification, into areas of limited or no utility, and in many cases into areas more properly called magic, the occult, and theology (in the sense that the assumptions and tenets can not be proved or disproved by physical evidence). Consider how many of our current "hot button issues" fit the occult and theological templates of unseen forces and arcane knowledge limited to specialist practitioners.
In the United States most states require a minimum of 180 days and/or 1080 hours of student attendance per year. It should be obvious that as this time is now fully "booked," when additional "stuff" is added, something else must be dropped. With the imposition of "Academic Trivial Pursuit" AKA "no child left behind," what was imposed was instruction in the skills necessary to score well on standardized objective tests [bingo cards] and short-term rote memorization and rapid recall of "factoids." What is being dropped are all vocational or "shop" classes. In addition to creating a generation that has no knowledge of how things work, the abolition of the vocational classes has lead to a huge upsurge in male dropouts who were attending school only for the vocational classes.
This is yet another example, where a critical public asset or facility, in this case free compulsory education, has been hi-jacked by the elite so they can impose their ideology and skim the benefits (i.e. college preparatory education) while the vast majority is deprived of the benefits (i.e. preparation for life rather than for yet more education) although the majority is expected to keep paying [more] for it.
The cure for this is local action, where the voters (parents) fire the existing school board, and where the new school board then fires the existing superintendents and principals, and so on.
Unka George (George McDuffee)
...and at the end of the fight is a tombstone white with the name of the late deceased, and the epitaph drear: A Fool lies here, who tried to hustle the East.
Rudyard Kipling The Naulahka, ch. 5, heading (1892).
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F. George McDuffee wrote:
With the

I agree with most of what you said. I do think that we need some method of measuring the effectiveness of schools. So we do need standard objective tests. And we do need to teach a certain amount of " factoids " as well as principles. Knowing a certain amount of facts allows one to concentrate on the larger problem. I would hate to go thru life having to look up the value of Pi when I need to know the area of a circle or go find a calculator. But we also need to teach understanding what accuracy is needed when using Pi.
The current tests may not be what is needed. But one needs to be able to put numbers on things in order to optimize. Sure more teachers are good, but what is the most cost effective number of kids in a class? And does it vary by age. Does it vary by the subject being taught. In high school the class size is about 30 to 35. But suddenly in college the class size might be 300 to 400.
And I think we need more competition in schools. The existing school board may or may not need to be fired. But there needs to be more charter schools and vouchers for private schools so students have choices. We need schools that prepare students for college as well as schools that prepare students for living without a college degree. Without competition the public schools are going to go for the one size fits all. It is a lot easier to administrate.
Dan
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