OT: Are Woodworkers smarter than your average bear?

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On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 18:56:33 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

Mine went from Bellingham Normal to WWCE/Western Washington College of Education (while I was there) to WWSC/Western Washington State College to WWU/Western Washington University.
--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple.
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Doug Winterburn writes:

Yes. All sorts of marketing goes on. Speaking of which, what is happening with Woodcraft University?
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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It's the *only* place where the 'reject' grade is P.H.D.
At least when the scrap box is overflowing. *snicker*
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There was also the 'North Idaho College of Education' (now Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston ID). My dad thought that cheerleaders there should *really* have the acronym for the college across the front of their sweaters. "Truth in advertising", as it were.
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There's a thriving business at the bookstore of Finlandia University in initialed wear.
Ball State sold a much-sought-after "Ball U" shirt back when I was up in South Bend.

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Around twenty years ago, At the University of Illinois, the women's engineering fraternity (the Society of Women Engineers, SWE) had the distinction of having one of the t-shirts they sold as a fund-raiser, get *banned* by the university.
The graphic a bearskin-clad caveman hunkered down in the foreground, chipping away at this 'round-shaped' stone, mounted on a horizontal stick through the hole in the center of it. In the background there was a cave entrance, standing near it is a curvacious cavewoman, clad in Wilma Flintstone type bearskin. and a 'come hither' pose.
The caption below the artwork read:
Engineering. The world's _SECOND__-oldest profession.
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There is an -actual- difference between a college and a university.
Having to do with the number of types of degree they offer.
A college offers _one_ type -- e.g. a 'B.A.' _or_ a 'B.S.' undergraduate degrees and advanced degrees in the _same_ area count as a single type. e.g. a BA, and an MA. A university offers more than a single type of degree.
I believe that 'appropriate' naming of the institution is an actual requirement of the accrediting authorities.
The 'breadth of learning' available at a university _is_ noticeably wider than at a college.
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Bob Bonomi states:

I know, but...as I said, it was State University at Albany when I attended, AKA Albany State. In other words, it's been a university since it was no longer a teacher's college (1949, IRC). But it pretentiously became THE University, at Albany, a few years ago, reminding me of why I generally try to stay well away from higher education types. Of course, Parkersburg has THE attorney-at-law, advertising constantly on TV. Hell, Albany State is only THE university because Russell Sage and Union are located across the Mohawk in contiguous cities.
The above definition is why I asked if anyone had any comments on the Woodcraft "University" in another post.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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More accurately the breadth of learning available at a university is "notably" wider than at a college. That is to say "worthy of note" whereas "noticeably" would indicate that the fact is readily noticed.
'Notably', we resort to pure distraction to avoid testing the finish on our latest projects. A solid strategy to avoid leaving a 'noticeable' fingerprint for our efforts.
Deep
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BIG JOE wrote:

I think their goal is to get the $12.95 from you. If you scored low, you'd lose interest real fast. Ed
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"BIG JOE" wrote in message ...

Yeah, me too. In my original post I said not to take it to seriously, I take it as a bit of fun, and that is all.

Clearly a result of the aging population as SAT scores don't reflect it. Age comparison tests would show a normal view.

I don't take any of them seriously, along with palm readings and astrology. I think anyone who has done a number of these tests over the years has had a variety of results.

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Or - they've changed the tests?
Dumbing down is a reality. Can't avoid pandering to the lowest scores, because they have one vote each, too.

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wrote:

I've always done well on tests like the Stanford-Binet, SAT, LSAT, AFQT and the like - but they always bothered me.
I was always concerned with what the testers thought that they were testing.
In particular, I have great reservations about those tests that purport to measure general intelligence. I used to know a guy who helped cobble up some of these tests for the boys in Princeton, where this sort of thing is a real cash cow - and that guy never impressed me as being real smart, himself.
It seems like they are an exercise in trying to find out 'how much like us you are' and I worry about how much like them any of us should want to be.
Too, the reporting of the scores can have an adverse affect on those who don't do well at this kind of thing, and may encourage those who do well, but may have no more common sense than a can of paint, to think too highly of themselves.
I wonder if Michelangelo would have even had the patience to take such a test - and how would he have done if he had - and who would have the balls to test him.
I suspect that Shakespeare would have been marked down in several areas, and if the scores had been reported back to him - I wonder if it would have thrown him off his game - nah - but it might have done, to a slightly lesser soul.
Who would have been qualified to measure the potential of Einstein, or Mozart, or Jefferson?
For my money - there are many different kinds of intelligence - and not all of them can be measured. Hell, not all of them can even be named.
When Psychology sought to break away from Philosophy, it did so on the argument of quantifiability - it was, it said, a Science - because it could measure and predict.
I'm not so sure.
I think it was because its practitioners simply couldn't hack it in the Agora.
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message

Folks like Stephen Gould and his book, "The Mismeasure of Man" (a good read, along with the Bell Curve, for anyone interested in the subject) insist that continuing attempts to quantify human intelligence/cognitive ability the past hundred years or so have resulted in marginally defining the opposing ends of the spectrum, but have not been of much more benefit than craniometry a couple of centuries back.
I am not so sure that I buy that. If for no other reason than measurement and classifying are basic techniques of science which have inarguably made scientific progress possible.
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yeah, but human intelligence pretty much defies quantization. what those tests measure is culture; ie, how educated are you by the cultural standards of the folks who wrote the test and how good are you at solving problems that those same folks can think up.
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Swingman wrote:

Actually, a really good overview is _The IQ Controversy_, a collection of essays edited by Block and Dworkin in the mid-1970's. Gould's book is a decent history, and Tucker's _The Science and Politics of Racial Research_ is an even better history.
_The Bell Curve_ should not be read in isolation: I'd strongly recommend reading _Intelligence, Genes and Success_ (ed. Devlin) and Fischer's _Inequality by Design_ alongside. The former re-evaluates the data and analysis of Murray and Herrnstein, the latter examines their political analyses.
One of the main criticisms of IQ claims-- not the only one-- is that what is being _measured_ isn't well defined. By and large, the skills measured on IQ tests tend to be clerical in nature. The same questions, presented in different ways can get wildly varying results. And the results are also strongly influenced by social factors-- ever try to do long division with Roman numerals?
What's termed Spearman's g is, basically, a correlation of factors which are measured in IQ tests. It's not an _average_, actually, but it's sort of a general measure derived from others. But one can't really call it a "trait." It'd as though one measured an athlete's skills at a) skiing, b) javelin-throwing, c) archery, and d) weightlifting, and combined them all into a single number called "Athletic ability." It's a number, sure, and one might get some insights using it. But it's not so much a trait as it is a statistical convenience.
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message ...

In this instance, I wondered what a test from the tickle site could be worth, "test tickle" didn't fill me with confidence.

These people usually fail the "Don't touch - wet paint" exam.

Ya think?

We tend to achieve what we are led to believe we can achieve. If we don't listen to our detractors then 'learned helplessness' is not a factor. I think Tom Plamann is a good example, he appears to only accept defeat when, hmm, well, I dunno - perhaps Tom simply doesn't accept defeat. I suspect a Spartan approach is used "don't tell me the number of the enemy, just the location".

Is this a comment on the school system? (leading question)

Thank goodness for variety, we'd be pretty bland if we were the same. 'viva la difference'

Lol, a number of professions have followed that ignominious road.
thought provoking post Tom,
thanks,
Greg
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Greg Millen writes:

What was it Chesty Puller said, "They've got us surrounded? Good. That means we've got targets in every direction."
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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The test measures the ability to discern pattern and similarity. It is a pretty close approximation of the way our brain is wired, therefore it can predict in a relative way, who will learn more rapidly. You can call that intelligence, motivation, whatever you care to, but the fact remains that our brains integrate new based on analogy with the old.
So keep yourself or someone you trust in constant contact with those young children. The more they hook up early, the more they have to hook to later.

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