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wrote:

As I indicated, this person wasn't a programmer, he was an algorithm developer. Completely different talent and skillset altogether. While some good algorithm developers are good programmers, there are fewer good programmers who are good algorithm designers. Typical development cycle consists of the algorithm developer developing the concept and testing it (hence the need for them to be able to do some level of coding), implementation then follows. Typical implementation is on a different platform and environment altogether than the proof of concept code.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Mark & Juanita wrote: ...

Atypical environment in my experience...sounds like a <good> environment, but certainly not the prevelant one... :(
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Well, to be fair, it's been ...24 years since I took that class, so my memory may be "a bit rusty". I do remember not liking it at all.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Might be time to look at F90/95 then? :)
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Gotta keep the pipes cleaned out regularly, Larry...
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I'll see you and raise you a FORTH.
"Forth is a recursive language. You can't understand Forth till you understand Forth."
I wrote a Forth interpreter for a Modcomp mini once when I was between projects and bored. The guy in the next office outdid me - he took the Forth and used it to build a Lisp interpreter :-).
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

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Actually, I rather liked FORTH. Built a 6500-based micro back in, er, '80 or '81 maybe, that used it. PicoFORTH maybe?

Well, if you understand registers and CPU-speak in general, it's not bad. (thinks) actually, I learned Forth first, which made learning assembler much easier.

Now that, is just _wrong_.
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Followup to myself - it may have been an '1802' CPU.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

I also enjoyed Forth <a lot>...did many systems in robotics and other embedded or real time monitoring control from early 80s through mid-90s. Had opportunity to meed Chuck several times at ORNL--a <most> interesting and impressive fella...
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DEFINITELY!!
The proper use of FORTH is writing floating-point emulators.
So says the Bible.
"Go FORTH, and multiply"
<groan>
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It's not the registers, it's keeping track of what's on the stack that drove most folks crazy. One of the other well-known comments about Forth was "Forth is a write-only language." I could usually read what I'd written if I went back to it within a few months, but that was about the limit.
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

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lgb wrote:

One can write "write-only" code in any language...Forth has it's practitioners of the art as does every other language.
Some of the most legible code I've ever seen was Forth--of course, it was written by some true experts. I recall an automated loom weaving control program presented at the Rochester Forth Conference some years ago. I was actually like reading a piece of literature for clarity--all one need was a dictionary to understand the English definitions of technical terms for weaving and the whole code was transparent.
Some of Chuck Moore's code was that way as well while other was well, dense might be a good description!
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That descriptor was usually applied to APL. where the 'half-life' for readability by the author was about half a day.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Humph. Late comer. How about Fortran I and FAP, later MAP and Fortran II. Lots of people writing good stuff to augment the manufacturer's offerings, including CARE (CDC 924 assembler), Boolfinder (JPL 7044 link editor), and a memory management system for 360 75's running RTOS/JPLOS (can't remember the name). The last three are unfair because I wrote them (most of them anyway) in about 1963, 1968, and 1971.     creak,     jo4hn
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'79 or '80 is as early as I get, having been 12 years old at the time.

/tip of the hat
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Ahead of me, also...I was just getting out of HS in '63 and didn't get to touch the IBM 1620 as freshman back then...had a full semester of hand-coding starting w/ binary, then machine language to prepare us for FORTRAN coding forms... :)
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

My first computer was the Burroughs E101, an externally programmed clank which was about the size of a desk and did about as much. At UCLA in the early 60's, the Math dept. had the SWAC with a 1401 (?) front end and the Fortran club used the WDPC IBM7090 which was state of the art. Jeez, some of the hardware of the time was nearly psychotic.     glork,     j4
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jo4hn wrote:

Yes...the first machine after school where I worked (starting in '68) was a Philco TransEra 2000. I most fondly recall the 27 7-track tapes for all external storage! :)
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Robatoy wrote:

Shucks and here I thought we could talk about Datapoint, Altair, Apple II, Horizon et al.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
  Click to see the full signature.
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I don't think I am in rec.woodworking anymore, Toto.
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