OT: air cleaner

I'm hoping someone here has the info I need.
We just bought an older (1956) house. It has a "Chrysler Airtemp Electronic (or Electrostatic) Air Cleaner". I could find nothing about it online except for another person asking about one like it. The response he got was essentially that he was SOL.
Does anyone here have any info on one of these that they could email me? It would be greatly appreciated.
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On Fri, 28 Dec 2012 17:30:27 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

I could use a schematic and troubleshooting tips for a Totaline Star CG1000 electrostatic filter unit, too. I found their data sheet online and the TS section is as follows. I was wowed, fer sher.
TROUBLESHOOTING If the air cleaner does not seem to be functioning, check the following: 1. Verify that the power supply light is on. If light is off, check power supply and wiring connections. 2. If power supply light is on, perform maintenance procedure and replace fiberglass filters.
Wiring is good, p/s putting out 25.6v. No power light on filter.
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On 12/28/2012 12:46 PM, Larry Jaques wrote: ...

Is that just the indicator neon out? Unless the discharge wires are broken, if the HV output is good there's nothing else to fail.
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It sounds like a clone of the Westinghouse Precipitron. If so, the principle is simple--air passes through a grid of some kind that's charged to a high positive voltage, then another that's charged to a high negative voltage. The dirt gets charged and sticks to the negative grid or plate or whatever. It's a super-efficient system--the only real problem with it other than that it has active electronics is that sometimes it sheds clumps of dirt off the collector. There should be some way to remove the collector plates for cleaning.
You want to get it working if it's not. That technology is hard to find these days--companies would rather sell you expensive HEPA filters that aren't as good.
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On Fri, 28 Dec 2012 17:53:36 -0500, J. Clarke wrote:

Thanks for the info. It appears to be working. It's hard wired into the furnace fan circuit so it only comes on when the fan runs. I've been a little leery of taking the covers off since I can't unplug it and it has a "high voltage" warning sticker. If I don't find out more I'll just throw the breaker for the furnace and hope there's no large capacitors in there.
And yes, I plan on keeping it as long as it works.
BTW, there's also a Carrier AC in the basement - a little rectangular box that appears to be a water based heat pump. I've been too busy to investigate it yet, but it ran when the inspection was done.
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On 12/28/2012 6:47 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

No info/experience w/ the particular unit but have had a Bryant since the 80s on which the HV supply died a couple years ago, sadly. It wasn't available any longer and the newer SS supplies were excessively expensive so since were replacing furnaces/AC units shortly anyway, waited.
Did that summer before last w/ Carrier systems and reinstalled a new Carrier unit.
They are an excellent choice, particularly for pollen and the like that is smaller than picked up by conventional filters. My mother had terrible hayfever allergies and in SW KS on a producing grain/cattle farm/ranch that wasn't a good thing. When the original was installed it made a world of difference for her.
As for yours--It'll have some way to remove the unit(s) for cleaning. The electroplates will need to be cleaned monthly; the instructions will undoubtedly say to wash w/ soap/water and dry but I have constructed a set of long "brushes"--essentially a thin plastic blade w/ some of the micro-fiber cloth attached to that will fit between the plates/high-tension discharge wires and it collects the dust quicker and more conveniently than washing.
The plates do not retain any capacitive charge when the power is off--they're perfectly safe to handle as far as any discharge/shock. Just be careful physically as the discharge wires are small and can be broken if mishandled.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

worked nicely. The units could be slid out and put in the dishwasher for cleaning. They would be covered with black sooty dust. Occasionally we would hear it pop as a spark jumped from one plate to the other.
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