Orbital jigsaw question


As mentioned in another thread, I just bought a Bosch 1590EVS orbital jigsaw. The orbital feature does not appear to do anything-- I know the diagrams in the manual are exaggerated, but should the orbital action be visible to the naked eye? I'm wondering if the control lever is actually attatched to anything...
The electronic speed controller won't run it any slower than 500 strokes/min, but holding the saw next to a straight edge, it sure looks like the blade is going straight up and down regardless of the orbital setting.
Other than that, it cuts very nicely. (No comparison at all to the old POS saw it replaced.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

orbital movement, but you certainly do see the results. Jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ron, I have a Bosch orbital jigsaw, older model than yours. The variable speed control allows really slow speeds, say 1.5 per sec, which allows you to see the orbital action. Maybe you should check with the seller that your variable speed is operating correctly.
Cheers Bill D NZ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got an older one as well, and the orbital action isn't obviously visible, at least to me. That being said, it's easy to detect during use - switch between the maximum orbit and none, and the speed of cut plummets. However, as the speed drops, the quality of cut increases.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The 1590EVS just doesn't go any slower than about 500 spm. Depending on the maximum speed setting (there are six) the saw will provide continuous speed variation at the trigger from 500 to the maximum speed that is selected. The initial documentation suggested that the saw started at 0 but I checked with Bosch and they said no. 500 is really adeqauately slow for starting the saw in just about anything and too slow for almost any sustained cutting. Also, going really slow negates the effectiveness of the dust blower.
Tim Ellestad

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have an older model (1587) that I bought used, without a manual, and I've never really understood the orbital feature. Can you tell me when and when not to use it? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HI,
    When in the orbital mode, the blade is forward as it moves upward making the cut, but moves back on the return stroke. This give the sawdust a place to fall out. This is inportant when the wood is about as thick or thicker than the blade stroke. Without the orbital action the sawdust tends to stay in the teeth which impedes cut. If the stroke is twice the thickness of the material, this is not very important.
    The orbit action causes problems when cutting curves. The sharper the curve, the greater the problem. If the jig saw is in the orbital mode, the blade tries to swings back and forth in a plane, but the kerf is curved, so either the blade must flex side to side as it orbits or the kerf gets widened.
In summary:     Use the orbital mode with thick material and straight cuts.     Use the non-orbital mode for thin material and curved cuts.     If you are cutting tight curves thick material, . . . well good luck.
Thanks Roger Haar
mblanc wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Orbital is a more agressive but rougher cut. I have an old PC orbital which my tool repair guy told me was about to give up the ghost so I bought the Bosch. The Bosch died six months later and I pulled out the "dying" PC. That was 5 years ago and the PC is still going strong. My opinion is that the Bosch is over designed and not a very good tool. It takes about five different tools to get the covers apart where the PC needs only a screwdriver. The orbital Milwaukee Sawzall is a bad assed saw too. I have used it to cut cast iron plumbing stacks with wood rough out blades. These cut faster than metal cutting or carbide impregnated blades. Used these blades to cut apart appliances (clothes washers, dish washers ect.) into pieces small enough to fit into trash cans. Rabbit
--
--
Lon Marshall < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.