Orbiltal(pendulum) jigsaw

Hi all, one simple question. I have to cut a straight line in a piece of laminated wood. Should I use the orbital motion or not? The wood is about 1 1/2" thick and about 24 inches wide and I'd like to have a clear cut since this is going to be my next laminated kitchen countertop.
Someone also suggested me to use blades intented for metal instead of wood as they are more "gentle" when biting into the laminated wood, can you confirm this?
thanks in advance, I don't have a lot of familiarity with these tools
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. Orbital is more aggressive but rougher.

Use a bosch "Progressor" blade for wood.
You can buy them here: http://www.toolbarn.com/category/bosch/bladejigsaw /
That have dozens of blade types for specific applications: you can drill down to get specs here:
http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Accessories/Pages/BoschProductCategory.aspx?catid ˜
-Steve
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the links. I guess I'll have to delve into Bosch website and see what's right for me. Thanks!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Thanks for the links. : I guess I'll have to delve into Bosch website and see what's right for : me.
That's your best bet. Take a look at these, once you get to Bosch's site - -they seem intended for that purpose:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)ήalt137844-20&linkCode=asn
I have used their new T308B blades on wood, and they're fantastic. Check the Boch website for specs, and read the reviews here
(Amazon.com product link shortened)46296058&sr=8-1
and here
http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/New+Jig+Saw+Blades+From+Bosch.aspx
I don;t know how they would work with laminate, but in wood they produce a remarkably clean and smooth cut (for a jigsaw).
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As Stephen indicated, going to orbital will only create a more agressive, faster, and rough cut.

NO! If you want a smooth cut in wood buy blades with no set in the teeth. Basically blades that are smooth on both sides. Bosch brand blades are going to be a good choice in brands.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"rooy" wrote:

I have one simple question in return.
Is this a totally wooden laminate or is there a plastic counter top materiaql also involved?
Lew
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a particle board covered by a melamine laminate.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"rooy" wrote:

Attempting to cut the above without "chipping" the melamine can be iffy at best with a jig saw.
Use a good Bosch BiMetal blade that clears on the down stroke.
Bosch makes a 10 TPI down stroke blade specifically for this application.
I forgot the blade number but check the 101 family.
Tape the cut line with masking tape, especially the top surface and TAKE YOUR TIME.
Cutting thru the tape will minimize the possibility of chipping.
If you rush things, the blade will bend outwards leaving a crapping surface.
Any chance you have a router or know someone who has one?
A router is the surest way to get a square clean cut.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't worry! I will go as slow as I possibly can! Unfortunately I have no router available, so I have to use the jigsaw and try to be as careful as possible, with the help of some masking tape and a jig. Looking at Bosch blades I think I'll go with a T308BF or a T101BRF as a second choice. They have a blade specifically for laminates (T101BIF) but I think it's too short for my board.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"rooy" wrote:

Not familar with T308BF.
T101BRF is what I had in mind.
Is the T101BIF a shorter blade than T101BRF?
How thick is this top?
Lew
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a straight piece of wood as a guide....also, use a shoe for the base of the jigsaw so it doesn't mar the surface.... (Bosch jigsaws come with one, you can make them as well
shelly
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry for reviving this old thread. Just to let you know that I finally made the cut with the jigsaw on my countertop! I used all the suggestions you gave me to make a straight cut (good Bosch blades, very light forward pressure, no orbital motion, a piece of wood as a guide, masking tape on the cut line, some protection under the shoe of the jigsaw and above all, PATIENCE!). The final result, though not perfect, is quite good! The only difficulty I found, was in keeping the blade vertical: after some cutting, the blade, while going inside the wood exactly on the cut line, had a tendency not to cut exactly up-down. Maybe it is the thickness of the wood, or I was pushing to hard against the guide and didn't realize it. Fortunately the beveled part of the countertop is not visible. Anyway, considering I never had a jigsaw in my hands before, I'm very satisfied with the outcome!
Thanks again for your help!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
    Just a quick word of warning. The down stroke blade tends to drive the whole saw away from the surface and quickly the blade is totally out of the material. Just go slow, keep a good grip on the saw and practice first.
Thanks Roger Haar
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.