Orange Peel


I just tried some spray poly on a small project. I like it because it's convenient and quick (no brushes to clean up). The one small problem I had is some slight orange peel (dimpling in the surface like cellulite). What;s the best way to A) avoid this when using spray poly, and B) fix it when it shows up?
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 03:38:41 GMT, the opaque Dan Major

A) Don't use poly spraycans. I prefer acrylic for that gaudy, glossy, highly-plastic look. It comes in matte, too! Shake the SPIT out of the can before use.
B) Clean the work first. Naphtha, denatured alcohol, lacquer thinner. And let it DRY before putting finish on. Compressed air can help but raises dust, so wipe (tack off) before you finish anyway.
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Dan Major wrote:

G'day Dan, The likely cause of the orange peel is to heavy a coat. Plenty of light coats does the trick. To remedy either A) Lightly sand back with fine paper = 240 - 320 and re coat. Just sand out the dimples, no need to sand of the poly. B) Cut back with very fine paper = 600+ cut with a cutting compound and polish.
I usually do (A) and have good results. All the Best John
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wrote:

I like to also (C?) finish it off with fine steel wool and Johnsons wax.... both on the wiping poly that I use and the spray poly that the wife uses....
mac
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had
it
Just a minor correction here - the cause of orange peel is too light of a coat. A light coat will deposit "spots" of paint on the surface instead of a film of paint. Subsequent coats are going to follow the contour of this new surface, which is now "bumpy". Many attempt to remedy the situation by adding heavy coats after the fact and it can reduce the drama of the orange peel, but it will never fix the issue. The best way to avoid orange peel is to learn to put down a film of coverage on the project with each coat. Think of yourself trying to spread plastic wrap across the surface and try to get your spray to accomplish that. You can do this and still end up with a light coat - but light is relative. A light coat is not a dry coat, it's a, well... it's a light coat. The contrast is a wet coat which is laid right on to the point where it is almost ready to sag and run. That's the coat that you put on last. Practice on scrap and develop the touch for putting on a film of finish. Keep your spray nozel close to the surface (6"-12" or so depending on the product or brand) and develop the speed appropriate to gain the coverage you desire. Don't move away to get a lighter coat or you'll end up with a dry coat.

You can even go up to 1000 grit to flatten out the dimples and then buff with a rubbing compound . Slower, but less likely to sand through and a lot less effort to remove sanding marks.

And that all by itself makes it a reasonable recommendation.,
--

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