Opinions Wanted - Trestle Table

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On Friday, June 27, 2014 6:18:31 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

What I meant by entrapments is the split wood strands, that extend from one side of the crack to the other, still well attached to each side. These should help any epoxy bond well to the two sides and remain secure.

The tree with rootball was dozed 2 yrs ago. I milled the log, back then, b ut only worked the rootball in the past 2(?) months. The rootball had bee n sitting out there all that time. The wood was still wet, when router p laning. Now, all the surfaces feel dry and I hope the inside of the crack has dried somewhat, also, but the leg slabs are definitely wet.

I'll trim those leg units... just didn't get to it last night.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote:
System3 recommends their epoxy not be used on green or wet wood. -------------------------------------------------- Don't sweat the petty stuff.
You're only filling cracks, not encapsulating a complete board.
Your problems, if any, will be limited to heat build up causing the resin to fire off and foam resulting in a defect which you will have to grind out and replace with new material.
This can be avoided by limited your fill to 1/2", let cure, then fill again with in 24 hours, building up as you go.
Forgot to ask, are you planning to glue these wide boards together forming one large board, or do you plan to just butt the board edges together and attach to the under structure?
I could see how you could butt the rough edges together, then fill the cracks formed by the boards with black epoxy.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Friday, June 27, 2014 8:25:19 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Since all the major parts are so heavy, I thought to key the leg units to t he trestle and loose-pin/dowel the tabletop boards together, as table leafs are loose-doweled to a fixed table top. With this wide of boards, I'm co ncerned with expansion and contraction, so I think they, individually, need to remain free floating.
Once in its permanent place, the table isn't likely to be moved, so the wei ght of the top (200+ lbs?) should allow it to remain in place, but I will a ttach it to the base with a loose/sliding connection of some sort. I have n't worked out that specific loose/sliding connection, yet, but it shouldn' t be too technically involved to execute.
I never thought to apply the epoxy a little at a time, and why. Thanks fo r that key info.
Sonny
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