Opinion Wanted: Finishing Technique

I made up a sample last night using a slightly different finishing technique. "Backwards from the normal routine". Just wondering if anyone thinks there will be a problem.
The finish for the red oak cabinet I have been playing with, is essentially a water based dye stain, grain filling, and glazing with an oil based gel stain, prior to top coating. Normal routine is grain filling after the dye stain.
Last night, I took a piece of red oak, raised the grain, sanded it down to prepare it. Then I filled the grain.
The grain filler I use is a thick water based paste. It can be diluted but I don't find dilution to be of value. I tint the filler with a black water based artists color. I applied it with a putty knife and scraping the excess off the surface. I let it dry over night.
This morning, I sanded it with 320 emery cloth and brought it down to a clean surface with a good fill.
Then I applied the dye stain. Let it dry. Then put the gel stain to it. I didn't seal between any of the steps which I would normally do. Then I started building the top coat with minwax satin finish poly.
End result, it worked quite well. There was no sanding damage to the dye stain which normally occurs. There was less pitting of the grain filler. The grain maintained the dark black color with the rest becoming a dark chestnut brown.
In summary; Conventional wisdom is to fill the grain after the dye stain. I liked filling before hand, cause there is less problems with not accidentally sanding through the dye stain.
Can anyone think of a reason why I should not go this route.?
Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Pat,
I have nothing for you, but you have just given a lot to me.
This is one reason I love the Wreck.
Thanks!
Lou

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Lou,
Your welcome. Wood's expensive enough without ending up with a finish you don't like. Experimentation is cheaper than refinishing or replacing the wood used.
Pat

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm not a dyer or stainer as a general finish (ammonia is about my limit) but I'd _always_ fill before staining. I can't imagine doing it the other way round, unless it was for a deliberate contrast.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Dec 2004 01:49:20 +0000, Andy Dingley

unless the grain filler is transparent acrylic....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Andy,
There is a deliberate contrast to pop the grain. But since the filler is tinted "black", I don't loose the grain, since the finish color is lighter.
If I didn't tint the filler, the grain would end up the same color as the rest of the finish and disappear.
Pat
On Wed, 01 Dec 2004 01:49:20 +0000, Andy Dingley

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.