One Project at a time...

I was watching Wood Works today, and noted the lack of evidence of any other incomplete projects in David Mark's shop. Norm's shop seems to be the same way (but I don't claim to be an expert on that.)
Personally, I work on multiple projects at a time. While the glue dries on one project, I'm working on something else. I wonder, can the guys who do one project at a time get away with a smaller shop space? After they're done with their cuts and joinery, they can assemble the project and proceed to finishing, using the same work spaces for each phase. On the other hand, someone who works on multiple projects at a time would need space for each phase. After all, it's probably not a good idea to make more sawdust while the black paint is drying on the cherry.
Maybe instead of wishing for a larger shop, we should just do one project at a time to stretch the space we have.
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Depends on the project. I usually have a "main" project and can do a few other little things on the side. That is relief if I hit a mental stumbling block. I prefer working on smaller stuff so space is not as much of a constraint. I'm not as interested in doing a 12' entertainment center as much as a box or shelf or other benchtop sized items.
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

SFWIW:
Living and working in SoCal allows me to basically work outside most of the year.
My work table is 4x8 and doubles as a fiberglass measuring and cutting table.
When not in service, it is covered with a tarp.
Have several saw horses scattered in pairs around the yard. On these saw horses rest some 2x4s.
These serve to store all manner of glue ups, stock that has been cut to size, cutting sheet goods to size; whatever, while I'm working on them.
Before I go home, these all get covered with plastic, otherwise over night dew would be a problem.
When done, break the setup down, stack in corner till next time.
If I had to, could operate out of an 8x20 trailer as long as I could spread things around to dry during the day and overnight.
Would be a squeeze, but could do it.
BTW, T/S stays under boat, covered by a tarp.
Roll it out to ue as needed.
Maybe this will give you some ideas.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

There's a drive-by... <G>
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Puckdropper wrote:

It's TEE VEE... <G>

Same here!

Very possibly...
I use shrink wrap to bundle my parts together, then I write on the wrap with a Sharpie, so projects stay together. Except in the case of final assembly of casework, the in-process parts collections are easy to store.
The spec that sets part of my space requirements are the minimum spaces required to maneuver parts on and around tools. A box maker can always use far less space than a woodworker who loves dining tables or chests of drawers. In this case, my space is dictated more by typical project than how many.
In my eyes, where multiple projects require extra space involves equipment availability. This is why my table saw, jointer, planer, and bench aren't "put away" (well, the planer has wheels...) and aren't used for storage, etc... Multiple projects are what made me move my router table from the saw table to a dedicated unit. It's also why I always keep my handwork bench clean. I can grab a stack of machined parts and start fitting or finishing them.
Folks who work efficiently in tight spaces are often good at planning all operations with a specific tool for completion in one session. That tool can then be efficiently stored, or the combo machine can be changed, while the same space is used for another operation.
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On Sep 14, 12:41am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

One thing I've found that really helps is to create list of projects - both ongoing and those that would be nice to make someday. For me this includes jigs, fixtures and other shop improvement projects as well as "real" work. For those pieces that I've started to make or am fixin' to start I jot down the next few physical actions I need to take to move them along. Even if it's a very simple task, I write it down. That way I get the sense of accomplishment that comes with crossing something off the list. It really helps when I get bogged down. Sometimes I get home from work and just don't have it in me to go "make cabinet doors", but I can pull it together enough to "rough out stile and rail material" or "set up for coping cuts on router table" or some other discrete task. And I find that once I get that one task under my belt I'm motivated to do more. It's just a way to trick myself into being productive. (This is something I started after reading "Getting Things Done" by David Allen. It's really helped me.)
JP
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On Sep 14, 12:41 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Other than finishing I think it has a lot more to do with how organized you are and how your mind works. I am lucky enough to have an area about the size of the shop right next to it where I have additional cabinets and lots of horizontal surfaces, and a whole shelving unit for nothing but holding parts. But if I didn't have that there is all kinds of wasted space in the shop under tools where I could be stashing stuff more efficiently, I just take the path of least resistance.
If you like to work on many things at once forcing yourself into doing one at a time isn't going to be fun. You'll just putz around more and everything will take twice as long to do. As much as I like to complain about how much stuff I have going at once, I like it that way. I'm bored if there aren't at least three projects going on at once. I start getting a bit frazzled around five though.
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