?on miter cut.

Page 4 of 6  


Interior angles don't have to add to 360. Exterior angles do. For a pentagon, interior angle is 108, exterior angle is 180-108 = 72.
5 * 72 = 360
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you would like the real formula for a MITER it is as follows A=(360/x)/2 where "a" is the MITER "x" is the number of sides For interior or exterior angles it would be A=(360/x) where "A" is the interior or exterior angle.
CHRIS

circle
as
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
18
Bob S.

am
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It would be a 36 degree angle The way to figure out any angle is very simple you divide 360 by the number of sides then divide your answer in halve to find out your miter example for a square : 360 / 4 = 90 then 90 / 2 = 45 degree angle Example for a pentagon : 360 / 5 = 72 then 72/ 2 = 36 degree angle
Chris

am
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
360 deg / 5 = 72 deg
Divide in 2 for each side of planter 72 deg /2 = 36 deg at each end of 2x4's.
Graham

am
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

WRONG!
And I'll accept your apology anytime you're ready.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If I was wrong then I'd apologise, as I'm not, then I won't.
The OP asked "What degree would I need to cut the 2x4's"
He would need to set his compound miter saw to 36 degrees...
Graham
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree Graham you are NOT wrong. And some people should learn to read the OP and not jump in the middle of a conversation you should check the posts on the A.B.P.woodworking about this topic also seems like this post really opened a can of worms
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Chris Melanson" wrote in message

Hey ... at least it is ON TOPIC!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/13/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which causes the saw to cut at an angle of (90 - 36) = 54 degrees.
Think about it: what do you set your miter gauge at to make a cut at 90 degrees? Unless you have a really unusual miter gauge, you'll set it at zero.
I think the confusion arises from careless use of terminology.
For *any* closed polygon of n sides, the sum of the exterior angles is (n - 2) * 180 and the measurement at each angle of a regular polygon is (n - 2) * 180 / n. To cut a mitered frame in the shape of a regular polygon of n sides, the angles at each end of each piece are (n - 2) * 180 / (2n).
However, to cut a board at the angle p, one must set the miter gauge to (90 - p) because miter gauges measure angle from a line *perpendicular* to the edge of the board being cut. For example, to cut a board square (90 degrees), you set the miter gauge at zero.
So....
To cut a mitered frame in the shape of a regular polygon of n sides, the _miter_gauge_ setting is (90 - p) where p is (n - 2) * 180 / (2n), or 90 - [(n - 2) * 180 / (2n)] simplifying... = 90 - [(180n - 360) / (2n)] = 90 - [(180n / 2n) - (360 / 2n)] = 90 - [90 - 180/n] = 180/n
Thus, to cut a mitered frame in the shape of a regular pentagon (n = 5), the _miter_gauge_ setting is 180/5 = 36 degrees. Which produces a 54-degree angle.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As I previously stated, read what the OP has asked for, not what you think he has asked for. If he has asked the wrong question, then that is a totally different matter.
Bob is not asking what angle his 2x4 has to be cut to (which is 54 deg), he is asking what angle does he "need" to cut the wood, so he can build a 5 sided planter. He needs an angle of 36 deg.
He applies an angle of 36 degrees to his CMS and will be able to build a 5 sided planter.
Graham
wrote:

zero.
of
set
the
angle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You guys are making this way too complicated. I'd love to get this group together to play 'telephone'.
Some careless use of terminology has muddied the picture here. The idea of 'interior' and 'exterior' angles is just confusing. There is only one angle one needs to be concerned with, and that is the (bevel angle) between the center of a regular polygon and any vertex.
The answer to the original question should be obvious by drawing a circumscribed circle about the polygon. Then draw 'spokes' from the center to each vertex. You will have created a bunch of triangles as well as circle segments. As we know from fifth grade math class, the sum of the angles of all circle segments always adds up to 360 degrees. This is the only thing that always adds up to 360 degrees. The sum of the perimeter angles between the polygon segments does not add up to 360 degrees except for 4-sided polygons.
So, with your little sketch, note that the angle between the vertexes and the center of a pentagon is 72 degrees, which also happens to be 360/5. Since your segment includes two such bevel angles, each is 36 degrees. This is the bevel angle. Period. End of story.
Imagine what would have happened if the original poster had wanted to build a gazebo...
Nice to see everybody staying on topic, though...
John
On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 00:05:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

John Paquay snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com
"Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets" http://home.insightbb.com/~jpaquay/shop.html ------------------------------------------------------------------ With Glory and Passion No Longer in Fashion The Hero Breaks His Blade. -- Kansas, The Pinnacle, 1975 ------------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yet the story continues.... ;-)
You've now got five isosceles triangles (two equal length sides). The angle at the apex is 72 degrees as you noted. Since the sum of the angles of any triangle must be 180 degrees, this leaves 180 - 72 = 108 degrees for the other two angles of each triangle.
Since the other two angles are equal, they must each be 108/2 = 54 degrees. This is the angle between an outside face and the mitre cut's face.
To cut this 54 degree angle on a mitre saw, set the saw to 90 - 54 = 36 degrees, since the saw's scale has 0 degrees as a right angle, and measures deflection from the perpendicular.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 09:40:53 -0400, "Greg Neill"

"Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets" http://home.insightbb.com/~jpaquay/shop.html ------------------------------------------------------------------ With Glory and Passion No Longer in Fashion The Hero Breaks His Blade. -- Kansas, The Pinnacle, 1975 ------------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not quite! You said.... "angle between the vertexes and the center of a pentagon is 72 degrees", which is quite correct. However, that is not the angle in question. The angles being cut are at the vertex, not the center. The angle at the center,subtracted from the triangle [180 degrees] formed by that and the angles at the vertices makes them each half of 180 - 72, or 108/2 = 54 degrees. Two cuts together form the angle at the vertex, 108 degrees.
By the way, has anyone here made those cuts, or made the item in question? It's not too difficult to do with a few scraps.
Dan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's bang on, in fact.
An octagon can take another turn if you draw a square within a square at 45. Then it's easy to see the inside angle of the octagon as 135. So two cuts would each be 67.5 as you say.
Using the formula:
Each inside angle is (8-2)*180 / 8 = 3/4 of 180 = 135 ...etc.
Dan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Danny Boy" wrote in message

it
You're preaching to the choir! ;>)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, that is correct.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This all comes down to a matter of where one is measuring the angle from. Where would the man set his miter saw? 36 dregrees (I almost wrote %%D).
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL.... I would like to see the 54 degree setting on the saw... I think what the OP was really wanting to know was what to set the saw at.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.