?on miter cut.

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What I have found, for the most part, is that the fault is on both sides. The "draftsman" is not usually a draftsman. He is often just somebody that learned to draw shapes with a CAD program. His knowledge of drafting standards and proper layout are usually lacking. Often that is on top of limited shop experience. On the other hand, people in the shop are often not any better. They never bother to correctly learn to read a print, thinking that a print should be like a picture and if they can't understand it, it's the draftsman's fault. This situation is very prevalent and usually continues this way as there is often no one that really knows any better.

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wrote:

To cut a 54-degree angle you set the saw to 36 degrees, for the same reason that to cut a 90-degree angle you set it to zero.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com
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In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

BINGO!! Swish! Nothin but net Doug. LOL!
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In defense of the CAD program and drafting in general, in the old days when one used a pencil and T square to draw, the "rule" was to not "over" dimension. Over dimensioning would be showing a dimension for every line or object on the drawing from more than one reference point. Proper dimensioning requires the person reading the drawing to do some math on his own to properly interpret unknown distances. For example, a line is 2" long and another line intersects this line .25" from one end. Proper dimensioned, the over all length of the line is shown and only the distance from only one end of the line describes where the intersecting line is located. Either a dimension indicating the intersection is .25" from the end of the other line or a dimension indicating 1.75" from the other end of the line is all that is required. In more complicated and detailed drawings this is not so cut and dry. The person reading the drawings should be able to interpret the drawings and to handle his end to make sure that the results are a reflection the drawings. This is probably much like a pharmacist that is able to read the prescription from a doctor. The patient normally has no clue as to what the prescription really says. This whole thread is a good example of why knowing how to read a drawing is essential. Full sized plans should not be needed by any one to understand a properly drawn and dimensioned drawing. CAD programs if anything have let some draftsmen become lazy or sloppy as it does eliminate a lot of thinking on the draftsman's part.
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In defense of the CAD program and drafting in general, in the old days when one used a pencil and T square to draw, the "rule" was to not "over" dimension. Over dimensioning would be showing a dimension for every line or object on the drawing from more than one reference point. Proper dimensioning requires the person reading the drawing to do some math on his own to properly interpret unknown distances. For example, a line is 2" long and another line intersects this line .25" from one end. Proper dimensioned, the over all length of the line is shown and only the distance from only one end of the line describes where the intersecting line is located. Either a dimension indicating the intersection is .25" from the end of the other line or a dimension indicating 1.75" from the other end of the line is all that is required. In more complicated and detailed drawings this is not so cut and dry. The person reading the drawings should be able to interpret the drawings and to handle his end to make sure that the results are a reflection the drawings. This is probably much like a pharmacist that is able to read the prescription from a doctor. The patient normally has no clue as to what the prescription really says. This whole thread is a good example of why knowing how to read a drawing is essential. Full sized plans should not be needed by any one to understand a properly drawn and dimensioned drawing. CAD programs if anything have let some draftsmen become lazy or sloppy as it does eliminate a lot of thinking on the draftsman's part.
Imagine full sized plans for a house, sky scraper or a highway from the east coast to the west coast.
wrote:

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Something (maybe) your speed:
http://www.coolmath.com/interior.htm

You might want to be a little less cocky when you're (obviously) working so far from your area of expertise.
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Please go and BUILD a pentagone to see that your MITER has to be 36 degreesand figure out what I mean. You have no clue what you are talking about. You are the one who is "(obviously) working so far from your area of expertise."
CHRIS

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Sorry for the spelling forgot to run through spell checker before sending the last post.
CHRIS

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Tell us again how the sum of the interior angles of a polygon must be 360 degrees. I get a kick out of it.
The sum of the interior angles of a pentagon is 540 degrees. Each interior angle is 540/5 = 108 degrees. half of that is 54 degrees.
If your measuring instrument is providing the right-angle compliment, then you want to cut at 90-54 = 36 degrees. Note that this is not the usual meaning of "complimentary angle" in geometry, where it refers to the 180 degree compliment:
\ \ \ 180-A \ A -------------\---------------- A \ 180-A \ \ \
Many mitre saws will provide a scale showing the angle from 90 degrees (0 is a right angle cut) and the right- angle compliment (90 degrees is a right angle cut).
In this case, you want 54 degree cuts on the legs of the pentagon so that 108 degree interior angles will be formed. And yes, 108 does not divide evenly into 360 degrees, and there's no reason why it should.
Figuring out how to use your mitre saw's dial is not the crux of the problem. It's knowing what interior angle you need in order to form a given regular polygon.
Quick, what's the required mitre cut for a nonagon?
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Read the OP And then try and build one using 54 I would like to see what yo end up with
CHRIS

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I would build a correct pentagon. My pieces would have 54 degree angles as measured between the outside face and the cut face:
-------------------- / \ / \ cut face / \ / <----- 54 deg -----> \ ----------------------------- outside face
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20
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That's the setting on the miter guage. The angle on the side of the board is 70.
Art

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My reply was in context with rest of the thread

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Exactly.

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On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 19:46:45 -0400, "Greg Neill"

He's mixing it up with the exterior angles which always add to 360.
Dan.
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Actually, Complimentary angles add to 90 deg. Supplementary angles add to 180 deg.
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I would suggest you do a little rethinking before you make yourself out to be this ignorant.

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Go and make one before you start calling me ignorant and do a little of your own rethinking as to why when you set your saw to LOL 54 degrees you do not come up with a pentagon. By the way what is your occupation??? I will bet you are not a cabinetmaker.
CHRIS

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On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 00:38:10 GMT, "Chris Melanson"

Using the formula (n-2)*180 as the sum of interior angles of a polygon:
With n = 5, you get 3*180, or 540.
If all the same (regular) you'll get 540/5 or 108.
To have two equal cuts meet at that angle you'll have to have each 54 degrees.
Most, if not all miters turn only to 45 degrees on the scale, and are initially perpendicular to the blade, so set at the complimentary angle (90 - 54) = 36 degrees.
Dan (not a cabinetmaker)
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