Old Violin

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On 2/3/2011 7:41 PM, sam wrote:

I have what is most likely the same violin with the same label. Mine is German student violin made around the late 1800, early 1900 period and was appraised at $400 30 years ago.
These were everywhere in the country during the early 19th century.
Still, as Rob said, take it to get it appraised.
Does it have a bow? If so, that is one good reason to get it appraised, as often those old bows are ten times what the violin is.
Hide glue is the only way to repair a violin if you want to keep both the value of the instrument and the tone.
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Sam,
I've got a guy here that does this type of repair work. If you decide to farm it out, let me know and I'll put you in touch with him.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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If you are determined to do it yourself, use hot hide glue, but please have it appraised first. The others are correct, except for the brown duct tape, should be yellow to comply with OSHA:-) Joe M

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I'd take it to a reputable shop before I even dusted it off. They can be worth money, unless screwed up by an amateur restorer. They may not be the million dollar ones, but they still can command good dough if not screwed up with some drywall screws and Gorilla Glue. Some of the copies are worth thousands. As mentioned before, a good shop will give you an itemized list of the work they will do, and what they will charge. They will also, (If you are a good talker) tell you how much it will be worth AFTER restoration. Anyone with a room temperature IQ can do the math and see which is the bigger number. And then, if it is just a break even deal, you might want to play around with it, and try to DIY. But I'd know for sure before I'd start hacking on it.
Steve
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"Steve B" wrote in message

I'd take it to a reputable shop before I even dusted it off. They can be worth money, unless screwed up by an amateur restorer. They may not be the million dollar ones, but they still can command good dough if not screwed up with some drywall screws and Gorilla Glue. Some of the copies are worth thousands. As mentioned before, a good shop will give you an itemized list of the work they will do, and what they will charge. They will also, (If you are a good talker) tell you how much it will be worth AFTER restoration. Anyone with a room temperature IQ can do the math and see which is the bigger number. And then, if it is just a break even deal, you might want to play around with it, and try to DIY. But I'd know for sure before I'd start hacking on it.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. Download the book. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
I mentioned this to my wife's cousin who plays first violin for the NJ Symphony and owns a Strad. According to him there are Strads and Cremonies that aren't worth crap as players. All there value is in the builders mark. On the other hand there are Yamahas that are tremendous players but only cost a few hundred bucks. The only thing to do is to get the violin appraised and a repair estimate. There is a good chance that if there is one crack, there is something else that needs regluing.
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