Old tools for a newbie?

A garage sale up the road from me has some old tools (described below). I think the guy might be asking too much, but I thought I might consult the learned opinions (often) found here.
I am rather new to woodworking, with a focus toward general household millwork, and furniture/cabinet building. My stationary tools consist only of a Ridgid CMS and a new General 650 Cabinet Saw (I am getting quite serious about this!). BTW, I will share my experience in purchasing and setting up the General saw in a subsequent posting a few days from now.
So, my shop needs both a drill press and a bandsaw (among other things). My question is whether the following should fit the bill. I don't mind cleaning and fixing things, but I don't want to pay too much, or any amount, really, for something that will only aggravate me.
Delta Milwaukee Homecraft bandsaw. He is asking $100 (but said make an offer). The serial number plate says Rockwell, Serial#AP1635. I could find no Model number on the saw. It looks to be about 10" from blade to throat. It runs, but there is no switch (unless unplugging the power cord is considered a switch). The blade wobbles quite a bit when started, but seems to settle in once up to speed. The guides appear OK, but they should be easily replaceable. The motor is a General Electric Model 26136, 5.4 Amp 110V, 1/4 HP at a speed of 1725 RPM. The motor is connected to the base of the saw via a 2x4 mounted about 25 degrees off horizontal. An unused extra blade accompanies the saw, with a label saying it is a 72.5" blade (nothing else useful). The unit is obviously quite old, but surprisingly not a lot of rust (and we are in South Florida!).
Craftsman Model 113.24581 15-1/2" Drill Press. He is asking $200 (and seems to be firm). Also on the model plate is "Mfg No 271", whatever that means. This is a bench unit (not floor standing). It seems to run fine, although the belt seems to be too loose. The quill does not vibrate appreciably while running (a good thing, I'm sure). It is variable speed (380-8560 RPM) by virtue of geared pullies (to be changed manually) at both the drive and spindle ends of the belt. The table will move up/down, but does not tilt. The unit is well rusted, but I think it might clean up nicely (with some accompanying satisfaction in doing so, I'm sure).
In addition, he had... Sears Model 106.153541 Air Compressor, 100PSI 6.4 CFM @40 PSI and 5.4 CFM @90 PSI. I would consider this mostly for exterior house painting, as well as spray finishing woodworking projects. I have no impact tools, but who knows? With an unnamed 2 Gal. "paint" cannister with two pressure (or whatever) guages attached, a spray nozzle, and hoses, he wants $100. This equipment is newer (probably less than 10 years by the look of it) than the above mentioned tools.
Are any of these diamonds in the rough? Should I go grab 'em before some smarter guy gets them first?
/rick.
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On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 14:18:06 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:

yes.
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Because..... ?
/rick.
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On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:26:05 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:

they look to be a good value- if you need those tools. if you outgrow them you can sell them for what you paid.
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i can't speak for anything but the air compressor, i got one, and it seems to be pretty good. i inherited it from my wife's grandfather, he still had the receipt from 1972, i don't remember what he paid for it. I have had no issues with it other than the line psi isn't good for impact wrenches. for an oil lubed air compressor, i would say that $100 would be a fair price, if you think that it will do all that you want.
On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 14:18:06 -0400, "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote:

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Bandsaw is about right, but maybe on the high side for the age. Probably from the '50s. Parts are hard to get.
Drill press is an Emerson and is way overpriced if it's really rusty. The only old drill presses worth that are high-end (Delta, Walker-Turner, etc) brands.
Air compressor is a good deal if it's in decent shape, but it's old. '70s vintage, made by Campbell-Hausfeld. Probably nice cast iron pump.
GTOJohn)
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More rough than diamond there, in my uninformed opinion.
--Scott "RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message PSI. I would consider this mostly for exterior house painting, aswell

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Buy what you need, not what you see. I think that buying cheap is a good idea for a newbie. At least you will know what you want when it comes time to upgrade. That being said, cheap is almost never best. Dave
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If he is staying around he could be a useful neighbour. If he is packing up to leave the area make sure you can afford to buy it and throw it away. Second hand stuff from people you are never going to see again is always a major speculation.
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