old substance under flooring

I've removed a section of herringbone oak flooring over concrete, installed in 1929. They used some black stuff for a substrate that's now hard, glossy and brittle. I was wondering what it is, and the best way to remove it.
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" snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net" wrote:

Sounds like it is an asphalt based mastic.
The VOCs are long gone; however, what is left will probably burn if it gets too hot.
I'd try a 1,500 watt heat gun and a putty knife.
Under no circumstances would I use an open flame torch of any kind.
Be prepared to get a mask if you start to smell vapors.
Lew
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Is it entirely necessary to remove it? Do you need to get down to bare concrete?
If you are going to cement new flooring down, you might save yourself a lot of trouble by seeing if the adhesive for the new flooring will adhere to the black stuff.
If that's not an option, one of these bad boys will chisel it up in no time:
http://www.toolmarts.com/bosch11241EVS.html
Scott
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And if you're going to use one of those, then a pair of these will make your day go a little easier. http://www.labsafety.com/store/Safety_Supplies/Gloves/Anti-Vibration_-Impact_Gloves/39353/54517XLL/?isredirect=true
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If it's brittle and has any thicknes to it, maybe try an automated tile remover.
Sonny
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Sounds like tar.
It might just crack up and tote out. It kept out termites and leveled the floor.
That is my thought.
Martin
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

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The old mastics that were used for flooring used to have been made with asbestos. If the year stated is correct, this may predate that. I would have a small sample checked before I chisel, burn or anything else..
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Over concrete is the key. Concrete sweats. Wood floor over sweating area - bad news.
Normally resin paper and tar paper is used.
I suspect the layer of tar was higher quality tar paper and leveling.
In any case if it is removed, something else has to replace it before adding wood over the concrete.
Martin
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

I recently removed some old vinyl tile flooring in our basement and was also left with a thick black glue of some sort. The best way I found to remove it was to use a steamer to soften it up then use a razor blade to scrape it. It's probably a different type of glue since yours was wood but the same method of removal might work. It's slow going...
Lance
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You might try dry ice.
Smitty
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