Old Craftsman RA Saw needs new table

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I inherited an old Craftsman radial arm saw, with a table and fence that are in very poor condition. I need to get a replacement somehow before I can use this saw. Part of the problem is that I cannot locate a model number on the saw. I have looked all over the thing, and I just don't see it. There is a model number on the motor. Would a replacement table for a modern model fit my saw? Would I be better off trying to make my own table? Any other options that I should consider?
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My Craftsman RAS is a 1970's model with a square metal table that the top sits on. On the left side of the metal table (as I face the saw) is a metal plate with the ser. # on it. Frankly, it seems the table that came with the saw was particle board and 7/8 to 1" think, although I don't remember for sure. At any rate some years ago I replaced it with some kind of 1" plus particleboard that has a melamine layer on top. For crosscutting I glued a maple wear strip in the top to keep ihe crosscut groove neater. If I replaced it again I'd probaly use MDF. Hope this helps. Jer

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google asks:

Just make one. Pick up an appropriately sized chunk of 1" MDF at your local lumber yard, cut it into, IIRC, 4 pieces, with one about 2-1/2" tall for the fence, a back-of-fence board about 3" wide and another about half that, and the front table about 18" deep. Cut to table width--I'm not near one of the saws right now, but 30-36" seems right to me. Mount on the metal table frame, with the fence inserted 2-1/2" side vertically, in front of the two narrower boards. Test for fit and test saw for squareness, etc.
Charlie Self "Men stumble over the truth from time to time, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing happened." Sir Winston Churchill
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The table is a piece of particle board. The fence is a piece of pine. Make one.

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The original post didn't appear on my server so I'll jump in here.
Building a new table isn't difficult. I've posted a few photos of one that I built at <http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/RAS_Table.html
I built mine 8 inches wider than the original and like having that additional bit of work support.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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Check out Ken Vaughn's website. Here is a link. It might help with some design aspects for your RAS.
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/radial.html
Regards,
Brad

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wrote:

Morris.. I like the size and look of your table..
WHat did you use for your fence? (type of wood, size, etc.)
I just picked up a very serviceable powercraft RAS for $50 at a garage sale and everything (saw/arm/motor components, stand, wheels, etc.) is in good shape after removing a few years worth of rust..
My project will be a new fence and table to replace the 1/2 plywood one that's badly warped, and any advice would be appreciated!
It's a different world, getting into RA after a lifetime of table saws, cutoff saws, etc., that all have steel tables... I thought at first that the blade was turning in the wrong direction, until I realized that I was looking at an "upside down table saw"..lol
Mac
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mac davis wrote:

Thanks. When I replaced the table I was working in a 10-1/2 x 18' shop. I moved to a bigger shop and have been tempted several times to build an 8' table (so I can stop screwing around with roller stands).

It began life as a pine 1 x 4 - somehow ended up on the junk pile and got ripped to about 2" wide when I decided that the old fence was past due for retirement.

Good find. I bought my old Toolkraft on sale at Montgomery wards back in the early 70's - it was my first stationary tool. Never been sorry I bought it. I hope yours brings you as much satisfaction.

My old (original) table was MDF. FWIW, I like the 3/4 plywood better - and hope that it'll be less inclined to warp. If you have space, you might consider widening the table. That does seem to add convenience.
Someone here on the wRECk (Rumpty?) is more of a RAS affectionado than I - you might check with him for ideas...

(-: I avoided that by making the RAS my first tool. When I finally got around to getting my table saw I still wanted the /blade/ to move. Moving the workpiece seemed pretty risky...
Enjoy the new saw - and remember that the /blade/ moves.
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better - and hope that it'll be less inclined to warp. If you have space, you might consider widening the table. That does seem to add convenience.
Your best result for your efforts of replacing your top would be a two layer quality ply with steel inserts (which will keep the table FLAT) and a sacrificial 1/4" luan ply top.
I have posted a drawing of this top construction in ABPW. The fence should be a piece of 3/4" clear pine and should be considered disposable. Don't widen the top too much, It's better to use extension tables that are removable when required say when using the RAS for shaping or moulding.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Rumpty wrote:

I knew it'd be a good idea to offer a referral to an expert (-:
It never crossed my mind to incorporate metal reinforcements into my top - as a result of your suggestion I may retrofit some angle reinforcements to the bottom of the table. If I get the design right I may be able to use the angle to provide attachment points for extension tables - I rather like that idea.
Shaping operations on the RAS made me sufficiently jittery that I added a shaper to the shop early on. At this point the RAS is used primarily to shorten long boards and (rarely) to cut compound miters. I suspect that at least one of the table extensions will become more or less permanent.
Thanks!
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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wrote:

thanks to Morris & Rumpty... THe old table (actually a "new" table that was never used) was 36" x 30" and very strange... they mounted it flush to the steel table frame with the risers all the way down, which not only warped it, but made the height crank useless until I took the saber saw to it..lol
I'm glad that you both mentioned a "disposable" fence of pine.. i work with a lot of pine but a few folks in the neighborhood say that it should be hardwood... seems a waste of good hardwood!
I'm going with the overkill method for the table... using 1 1/8 floor material that should be pretty warp free.. The table top will be 48"x24" this time with the table offset to the left for the extra foot... it seems odd to me that most RAS table tops are centered on the table frame, when the blade runs so far to the left of the arm...
I was going to go with an 8' x 24" table, but decided that I wouldn't have room for that... unless I decided to never close the garage door.. Using the 1 1/8 material and a 1/4 plywood facing, (plus a little bit of furring for adjustment), I should be able to have the RAS table the exact height of my bench, giving me an extra 6' of table on the right or "feed" side of the table..
damn, reading this, I sound like I know what I'm talking about!! actually just summing up some good advice gathered here and on the web..
thanks again!
Mac
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<snip>

The beauty of the wReck!
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Rumpty wrote:

I like this approach; and you've got me (re)thinking my RAS table design. I think I'll rebuild it to incorporate the steel stiffeners; and I think I'll reduce the table width and add detachable extensions to both sides.
To attach the extensions, I'm planning to add 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 x 1/8 aluminum angle to the underside of the table - full depth but attached only to the fixed portion of the table - and a matching angle to the end of the extension so that it'll only take two bolts to connect the two. (Picture of angle clamped in place on RAS table on ABPW)
I'm planning to groove the extensions so I can install mini T-track flush to the surface of the extensions and in line with the RAS fence. This should let me install movable T-stops (see http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/t-stop.html ) which should make repetitive cutting easier.
This is becoming too much fun (-:
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I have had a Craftsmen RAS for twenty years, It was my first stationary tool also. I have replaced the table twice. It came new with 1" MDF. At replacement time I ordered new from Sears because no one carries anytime bigger then 3/4 MDF at the time. Because it was expensive I put a piece 1/4 Luan (sp) on top. I have changed it many time over the last 15 years but the MDF looks as good as new. For a fence I use a 1 x 3 piece of poplar. HTH - George
wrote:

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mac davis wrote:

Since nobody seems to have mentioned it, you might want to check out <http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com/ . If yours is one for which there's a replacement guard available, you get a new table with the new guard, and it's all free.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 12:48:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Mine turns out to be a 113.23111, not eligible for the refit.
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GreenLight wrote:

Get ahold of a model number that is good and use that. They will send you a blade guard and a new table. Chunk the bladeguard and use the table.
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 12:48:58 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Nope.. I just jumped into the craftsman thread because of morris's link to his table.. my say is an old monkey ward power kraft..
Mac
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Mac ...
<<Nope.. I just jumped into the craftsman thread because of morris's link to his table.. my say is an old monkey ward power kraft.>>
In that case, get in touch with these guys: http://www.toolkraft.com/ and see if you can get the specs from them. (Ask for George. He's the PowrKraft guy.)
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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Probably making your own table is not a bad option. All you really need are some T-nuts and the old table as a pattern. I would glue two thicknesses together to get the thickness you want. My table is thicker than the ones on the saws now-a-days. The table has a screw assy in the middle to take the warp out of the table, but a mover busted mine 6 years ago and my table is nice and flat still. When you do put on a new table, I recommend using some 1/4" hardboard to protect the new table. My 30 year old table is still about as good as new on the top because I did that right away.
snipped-for-privacy@milbaugh.com (GreenLight) wrote in message

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