Ok--the old guys were right about sharpening

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Figure 8's and Oval is the method I was taught and used all these years. Figure 8's seem to give the best results, however they do tend to wear a hollow in the centre of stone over time. Life is series of compromises ;)
regards John
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On 6 Feb 2007 19:12:31 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Figure 8's are just dandy. Some guys will claim that that pulls the burr under and knocks it off so lapping the back isn't as important, but I couldn't say if that is true or not. Whatever works for you.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

A URL someone posted yesterday suggested a W pattern. He said figure 8's are too hard to keep perfectly square.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Check out this site. http://www.antiquetools.com/sharp / Once you have your technique down, it is really a lot faster to sharpen without a jig. Tried this once without too much success, but came back to it when I bought a set of Norton waterstones that included a DVD on sharpening. Would never have bought the DVD by itself, but watched it for kicks. It was Joel Moskowitz (proprietor of tools for working wood) demonstrating the method described in this site.
For this to work, you have to have a well-defined primary bevel. Krenov suggests a small-diameter, slow grinding wheel. If I had a Tormek, I would use that. I have had luck with establishing that primary bevel on a 220 grit water stone, using a jig. (have also done it using the hand method described here, but that 220 grit is tough on the finger tips.)
I like water stones for their faster cutting, but you are right--a good washita or India stone followed by a hard Arkansas should do at least as well.
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RE the "old guys," I have to assume that you are not talking about me here... though I did write of using the old methods recently. ;~)
...

My boys are learning this. I will not let them use my big stationary power tools (or the handheld power tools for that matter) but they regularly use my L-N saws and planes and other good quality and well tuned handtools. When it's done I'll post some photos of my 9 year old son making his Pine Wood Derby car for next Saturday's race. It's pretty unique in that it is veneered with curly maple and walnut and all the work was done with hand planes and hand saws... He'll make some additional parts on the scroll saw Thursday and Friday. He's no stranger to any of these tools.
John
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