OK Folks, Besides the Cabinets. How about a moveable Island?

Well It'll be a couple more weeks on the cabinets. In the mean time I'm designing an Island that's moveable I'm stuck with approx 36" by 26". I'm open to all suggestions, and I only have one concern and that is I currently have an engineered wood floor that I'm replacing with Ceramic Tile and my concern is the possible damage from rolling this thing around!
Thanks!
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When I put ceramic tile on our kitchen floor my wife was highly pleased.........at first. Easy to maintain, very attractive, etc. But don't drop anything hard (like a pan or dish or tableware or....) on it. I had to replace about 8 sq.ft in front of the sink already.
Max
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Sat, Mar 5, 2005, 2:14am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.netnot (Max) claims: <snip> I had to replace about 8 sq.ft in front of the sink already. Be less clumsy. Or, put down a rubber mat.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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You're correct! Well as stupid as it may seem, I use an industrial rubber floor mat across the kitchen floor in front of the cabinets and sink for fatigue. So that saves me some work. I am worried about it though! Thanks!

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HMFIC@1369 wrote:

like the engineered wood, I put that in ours a couple years ago and it looks great.
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4 Quality casters with a semi-hard, wide tread shouldn't be a problem. If you are putting granite on that island, go to a bigger wheel. Hard rubber wheels distribute the load more evenly. You can hide those unsightly casters by building a wooden skirt around them which can double as a footrest.
I guess you're not putting a bar sink in that island, eh?
00
Rob
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The problem with the wood skirt is that I can't lock the wheels. I will certainly look for a wider wheel... Thanks!
wrote:

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There are ways to raise/lower the wheel using a lever, rather than using locking castors that you have to reach down to. Check out some mobile tool bases. Basically, the wheels are pushed down using a lever, allowing you to move it around. When you get it where you want it to be, the wheels are raised up, and the base will rest on some rests instead of the wheels.
With a little ingenuity, you should be able to rig up a lever that operates at countertop height, or is foot operated through the skirt. Either way would beat bending over all the time to unlock the wheels, IMHO.
Clint
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sounds like plan, I do recall something to that affect..... Thanks!
wrote:

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A voice of experience here....
Did the ceramic floor thing in the kitchen a couple houses ago. It looks great, but...... 1) it's cold as ice in the winter. your feet will always be cold. 2) ANYTHING you drop on it that is hard with chip the tiles. Also, things that normally don't break, like Corelle kitchenware, WILL shatter into a gazillion pieces. 3) It's impossible to kneel on the floor for any length of time - the hard floor is super hard on your knees.
Fast forward two houses.... We have hardwood floor (oak) in the kitchen and love it. All of the problems above are eliminated. Only issue is to get wet spills mopped up quickly. And be a bit careful that your furniture legs have felt bottoms so they don't scratch the floor.
Don't do ceramic in the kitchen.

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I agree for the most parts of your arguments. I "had" a beautiful maple floor, that got flooded, it was painful. The specific ceramic tile I really really like though. I will have electric heater installed under it, and the areas where most of the work will be done will have a rubber mat simply for foot fatigue.... My first choice was just put the maple flooring in again, then I looked at Bamboo and considered this because it's not as hydroscopic as wood, but when that tile caught my eye it did fit in perfectly...
Thanks, Joe

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On Fri, 4 Mar 2005 20:58:21 -0600, the inscrutable "bob"

Agreed. When I finally get tired of the ugly linoleum in this kitchen, I'll be carpeting with i/o carpet and changing "scenes" (color and/or texture) every few years if necessary or wanted.
I dislike the cold feel of lino, tile, and hardwood flooring, though I like the ease with which hardwood cleans up.
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Have you checked out cork?
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I looked at Cork, I think it's cool just not in the kitchen.

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Consider casters with urethane over metal wheels - less likely than rubber to mark and they also look good - would get 2" wide and no small diameter than 3" - yes they make them smaller. Suggest u check out surplus center . com - good source.
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thanks will do!!

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Get the largest diameter rubber wheeled caster that's practical. If you get some with light grey rubber you don't need to worry about scuff marks.
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thanks!

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