Oak Molding

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On 6/13/11 11:25 AM, CW wrote:

brilliant.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"CW" wrote in message
This is what I love about this group. The guys says, "I do not have a nail-gun," and no one can take that at face value. Nobody can assume that the guy obviously knows about nail guns, which is blatantly obvious from his statement, but for whatever reason, isn't using one and wants to know the best NON nail gun technique.
That's the way it works around here. Want a good discussion about the advantages of hand cut dovetails? Just ask how to set up a dovetail jig.
============= Yup we just did it again bringing it up with a troll post!
Duh!
--
Eric


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"Leon" wrote in message wrote:

I have done my share of base board and shoe moldings, did this for a builder 10 or years ago. I used a finish nail gun but it was all painted trim.
You mention a pin nailer for oak, is there a pin nail long enough to go through the shoe molding, sheet rock and then the 2x?
====================== Painted trim? Yeah use a headed nail when possible. Brads, finishing nails, I have even used staples for door stop, depending who is doing the painting.
Finished oak, use a pin nail available up to 2.5" (hmmmm...maybe 2.25") in 23 Ga.?? (would have to look at the boxes) Don't ask me how they even penetrate oak but they do.
--
Eric


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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You don't; it won't stay put. You attach it to the framing *behind* the drywall.

Finish nails. Size depends on the thickness of the quarter-round.

Long enough to completely transfix the quarter-round and the drywall, and penetrate about an inch into the framing. This will depend on the size of the quarter-round and the thickness of the drywall.

Can't hurt, except possibly by wasting time. Test on a piece of scrap quarter-round: does it split when you drive a nail through it, or not? If it does, then pre-drill.

This is the perfect excuse to buy one. Nail guns excel at attaching trim. Do that once with a pneumatic nailer, and you'll never go back to doing it by hand. No worries about hammer dings in the trim, no worries about the nail set slipping off and holing the trim, just point and squeeze. Takes about 1/10 the time. Do it. You'll be glad you did.
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On 6/12/11 1:18 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Obviously, it's proper technique to nail into studs and/or sole plate, but if you run across the situation, you can hold trim to drywall but cross nailing. One nail goes in at an angle aiming to the left and another adjacent nail goes in at an angle aiming to the right.
I did this with relatively small amount of trim in an office that had double 5/8" drywall and steel studs. It held very tightly.
--

-MIKE-

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote the following:

beforehand. This allows the nail to 'punch' a path in the wood rather than 'squeezing' into the wood and possibly splitting the wood.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 6/13/11 8:30 AM, willshak wrote:

Great advice. That's also good practice when toe nailing when framing.
--

-MIKE-

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I have never found that to work for me. It always just stops the nail penetrating at all and it bends over.
Nails have sharp tips on them for a reason....drill if hard wood or dry wood.
---------------------- "willshak" wrote in message wrote the following: How can I attach 25 feet of quarter-round oak molding to drywall?
What kind of nails should I use? How long should the nails be?
Do I pre-drill the oak molding?
I do not have a nail-gun).
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On 6/13/11 1:52 PM, Josepi wrote:

I don't know what you're doing wrong (other than top posting), but I've blunted the ends of nails to keep the wood from splitting, I would guess, hundreds of times and it works great. It's a tried-and-true technique that probably goes all the way back to the invention of the modern nail. Cut nails were blunt and sheared the wood fiber when driven. That was probably an accidental benefit of the process of making them and not by design.
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-MIKE-

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