O/T What are the real truths? What is happening right under our nose?

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Tom Bunetta wrote:

Don't tell me someone else took/failed the same metal shop class as Rosie!
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Fuck You
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You're not my type... Take a look at the pics on apbw... Given the "official" story, how could they be? tom
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in

Go Cheney yourself.
--
FF

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wrote in message news:...

Lying to Gongress? Liars prosecuting liars. If I could give the world an enema, about 600 hundred syringes would be appropiate for the DC area (I've included a few aides and newspaper people). The asshples of the world.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 10:25:39 -0500, "Leon"

I don't know what "many years ago" is to you, but it takes me back to my yout of the '50s, when regular was commonly 22 a gallon or thereabouts. We were never premium users, so I can't say with certainty that it wasn't 11 higher but I'd be very surprised if it was. When I was doing my commuting during the '60s regular was still relatively low, ranging from 28 to 34, but I am fairly certain premium (or any gas) was not over 40 then.
I remember well the gas lines of the '70s and when the price started creeping toward $1, but premium was never $1.50 until much later. Even closer to now as we've gone past $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, and $3.00 I don't ever remember seeing premium at half again as much.
It would be my assessment that the 8% you quoted to 10 or even 15% is actually closer to the historical record. I can't imagine it was ever "commonly 50% more expensive." That doesn't jibe with my memory.
Of course even when Sunoco had pumps with about six or more selections of grade (remember 260?) I'll bet there wasn't as much as a 50% premium from lowest to highest grade.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Never happened. 5-10% max.

I remember Sunoco 280. It was about 20% higher than 'regular leaded.' I live in a Sunoco town. We have a refinery right here. It might be purely a 'mind' thing, but I feel like there's always a little more power after I get Sun Oil gasoline. Sunoco treats their employees a little better than the others.
r
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"LRod" wrote:

Along about that time gas wars were common in Detroit.
Would hear stories about $0.16-$0.18 sometimers as low as $0.15/gal from people who had just been to Detroit.
Of course, to put things in perspective, minimum wage was $050/hr for part time help and had gotten all the way to $1.00/hr for a 40 hour week by thye time I graduated from hiogh school.
Still remember going to the Amoco station and filling up my motorcycle (less than 2 gal) with their super Hi-Test for $0.50 which lasted ALL week.
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paid was 19.9 and I was making minimum at 1.65 in 1972.
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Leon wrote:

Picturing the movie "Dazed and Confused"... <G>
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2008 19:18:55 -0500, Leon wrote:

In the mid '50s I was making the munificent sum of $48 a week - $54 if I worked night shift. I don't think the gas prices were much different from the '70s then, but the octane sure was better than today :-).
Often times I'd make midnight rounds of the gas stations with a couple of buddies and drain the hoses into our motorcycle gas tanks. Sometimes getting enough gas to run 100 miles. For free!
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You got that right. My 72 Chevrolet Vega, what a POS, required a minimum of 92 octaine fuel. Regular was normally 95, IIRC the 92 was only available in unleaded. Premium was way up there.
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Around that time I was driving a 1965 GTO would only run on Sunco 260 at .31 or it would ping and knock something terrible now it is more than ten times that amount for the 85 octane crap they allow to be sold in New Mexico. First worked in an Exxon station Regular was .27 with Green Stamps and often glasses of other crazy stuff thrown in.
--
Mike
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On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 20:08:32 -0600, "asmurff"

Howdy,
Factoring in inflation, the current price is roughly the same...
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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In the '50s, unleaded was only available in Amoco stations. It was Amoco's primary selling point.
My '57 Chev 283, dual 4s, Duntov cam, 10.5 CR, had to have Esso Extra even then (my first new car), would probably blow up on today's fuel. Diesel itself to death. I always felt it ran better on the Golden Esso, advertised at 105 octane, but probably not.
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Out of the showroom?
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I could take most '57s. Couldn't take vettes that had a driver. A good '57 power pack with a driver could take me at least half the time (if not more). I was running a '41 ford coupe, '48 59AB block Merc bored and stroked. Had Edelbrock 10:1 heads, Fenton triple manifold, running Strombergs. Had an Edelbrock 3/4 cam that I screwed around with. Polished valves, and light springs. Was running a Linc Zepher trans with a 4:11 rear. Pissed me off when stuff out of the showroom was beating me. I guess I ushered out the 'Flathead era'. Left me no choice, but to join the crotch.
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in

I've had my flatheads--most recently (about 40 years ago), a '51 Ford business coupe I'd love to get back.
Showroom stock super cars really began in '56, I think, with the Chev power pack 265. The next year, the power pack 283 was a pisser, and my '57 was the Urine 8 of them all, at least around where I lived (dear old Westchester County, NY, a place I joined the crotch to leave). I was paying $78.37 a month on that '57 when I went to Parris Island at a munificent $78 a month (no uniform allowance that first 14 weeks). Mom sold it. It was probably just as well. 1957 was the first year of mandatory auto insurance in NY, with about a 65 buck premium. I think within five years that had hit $200.
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The least I ever paid for gas in the USA was $.119. This was in 1957 at many stations along 'gasoline alley (Columbus Ave.)' in Springfield Mass. during the gas wars. Had a '41 Ford coupe with a '48 Merc 59AB block. Triple Fenton manifold mounting Stromberg 98s (or was it 97s?). Had a three quarter cam and Edelbrock 10:1 heads. Headers and the loudest glass packs in the state. I could beat most showroom Chevy's, but vettes were a problem. I loved the flatheads, but I knew the era was over.
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wrote:

When I was 19 and still living in Corpus Christi I vividly recall paying 19.9 for regular and premium was 29.9 at the local Shamrock station. I was able to enjoy that one time. Normmally the gas in the early 70's was 22-25 for reg and 32-35 for premium.

See above, I never could understand how some could afford to pay 35 cents for premium. Keep in mind that Corpus Christi had and has lots of refineries.

Sorry you can't temember but it was.... I was in the automotive business even then going to school and working part time, I kept a close eye on all those prices. Pennziol 30W was 32 cents per quart, Havoline was 28 cents per quart. Uniflow 10-40 was 34 cents.

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