O/T: Up Yours

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Yes clathrates. Methane forms them too. There are large deposits of methane clathrates on the ocean floor, metastable at their present temperature of pressures. But if they warm up just a little, they'll let lose.
It might have happened in the past, google methane gun hypothesis.

They're talking about pumping it into the voids under the North Sea left over from petroleum extraction. At those depths it will liquefy, or maybe form clathrates.
Sounds nuts to me.
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Since the extraction of oil and gas leaves holes that can and do collapse, filling the voids (especially under inhabited regions) has the advantage of preserving the integrity of housing etc.
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Han wrote:

So how many houses are there in the North Sea?
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I think there are some oil drilling and distribution rigs. Would not be good if they get damaged. There was an earthquake of sorts (3.5 on the Richter scale) in the province of Groningen (Netherlands) where there has been so much subsidence and damage that the local government and the gas- winning company (NAM by their Dutch initials) are paying compensation. I don't know whether there are plans to "fill" those voids with anything, but I believe that in some places water injection is used to crank up gas and maybe oil winning. That's where CO2 or carbonate injection could help.
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The nuitty part is capturing the carbon dioxide from power plants and transporting it there.
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Sorry, not sure about "nuitty". Technology to trap and chemically bond smokestack gases is in use, although stupid regulations seem to make utilities able to avoid retrofitting.
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"Han" wrote:

The energy lobby spent their money well when they bought the shrub.
Lew
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What about converting the CO2 to carbonate? I think this is how some scrubbers operate.
The product of which (Na2CO3, K2CO3, CaCO3) could be sold to off set the cost of scrubbing.
The product carbonates also take up less volume to store.

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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

And how much market is there for them?
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Not sure. But, there is a need for them, so the market must be there. The goal is not really to market the product, but to produce the product and reduce the raw material.

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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

But if there's no market you still end up storing it.
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You could give it away free. People use carbonate compounds in industry. They would gladly take it away for you.
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

And what would they do with it? Remember, you can't allow any uses that result in it releasing CO2--if you do then you may as well not have wasted your time making it in the first place. That means no baking with sodium bicarbonate, no making cement out of calcium carbonate, etc.
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SOOOO very WRONG!!!! Most carbonates are mined. Which is better for the environment? Dumping tons of mined carbonate-co2 into the atmosphere or recycling/reusing co2?
Below are a few from Wikipedia:
Sodium carbonate uses that do not release CO2 (From WIKIPEDIA) In casting, it is referred to as "bonding agent" and is used to allow wet alginate to adhere to gelled alginate. When mixed with water and put in a spray bottle, it is sold for its anti-mold cleaning ability. It is also used to blast off mold from wood or other materials. In domestic use, it is used as a water softener during laundry.
FYI after your dry ice density response, I am beginning to think you are a TROLLING me.
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

Can you replace the mined carbonates one for one with that produced from your power plants?

Yes, those are "some uses". What is the _major_ use?
And if it's used as a "water softener during laundry", _then_ what happens to it?
Same for "anti-mold cleaning"--what happens to it _after_ that? Does it cease to exist after it goes down the drain?
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I dug up a reference for ya. This guy is using NaOH as the base so he ends up with NaHCO3 (baking soda). Is there a market for super pure baking soda??
Chem: CO2+H2O <----> H2CO3 H2CO3 + NaOH -----> NaHCO3 + H2O
Not carbonate in this reference, but bicarbonate. I suppose if you adjust the amount of NaOH and monitor the pH you could also make Na2CO3 with his process.
http://www.news.com/Can-baking-soda-curb-global-warming/2100-13838_3-6220127.html
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

http://www.news.com/Can-baking-soda-curb-global-warming/2100-13838_3-6220127.html
Now, find out what the major use of baking soda is. I believe that you will find that it is, well, _baking_. Then look at what baking soda does when baking. It reacts with acidic components of the recipe to release CO2. So the CO2 is not locked away where it doesn't contribute to greenhouse emissions, it's just released a little later.
Of course you could make baking soda and store it in a warehouse somewhere forever and ever and ever and ever and ever and pray that the warehouse doesn't burn down, because when you get the stuff hot, what does it do? It breaks down and releases CO2.
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Do you know the meaning of the word RECYCLE? Would you rather we mine NaHCO3 that would end up simply releasing CO2 from underground?

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NaHCO3 is not mined, but it is made from carbonates that ARE mined.
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

So how much of the mined NaHCO3 would we replace? If not all of it then maybe we're looking at the wrong source of CO2. If more than all of it what do we do with the remainder?

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