O/T: The Hammer Dropped

Page 5 of 5  
Han wrote:

Redistricting should be interesting here in California this time around.
The voters voted in a new way of redistricting, a panel of private citizens, not the elected politicians, get to establish the districts.
Since California will get some new seats in the house of representatives due to population shifts, should be interesting now that gerrymandering has less of a roll in the process.
Stay tuned...............
Lew
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Amen!
--
Best regards
Han
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Leon wrote:

Most election laws provide that a person remains in office until "his successor be qualified." This means that when no election is held, or no one wins, or an ineligible candidate prevails, the current office holder continues in office.
There have been more than a few instances in which a dead person was elected, so the situation is not that unusual.
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message

http://americaswatchtower.com/2010/07/29/charlie-rangel-indicted-for-13-ethics-violations /
http://nlpc.org/stories/2010/08/02/rep-maxine-waters-charged-ethics-violations-house-committee
When it comes to corruption I don't see any difference between the parties. Whoever controls the committees that spend the money is targeted by special interests. So when the Dems controlled those committees for many long years, they got the bulk of indictments and convictions for corruption. When the Repubs controlled Congress it was their turn, can anyone say "Abramoff"?
But in the cases you cite above please note there are no criminal charges involved. I don't doubt Rangel and Waters are bent, but they aren't in danger of being convicted of felonies, those are House ethics rules violations. DeLay, on the other hand, is now a convicted felon facing prison time--that's a significant difference. If we cast a wider net there is no problem finding Dem members of Congress convicted of felonies--Wm. Jefferson comes to mind--but the cases you mention don't qualify.
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 11:40:33 -0800, "DGDevin"

True. I forget how the meaning of "indictment" can vary so widely. AFAIC, all politicians are scum and are criminal elements.
-- Education should provide the tools for a widening and deepening of life, for increased appreciation of all one sees or experiences. It should equip a person to live life well, to understand what is happening around him, for to live life well one must live life with awareness. -- Louis L'Amour
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The actual quote reads: "The wheels of the Gods grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine".
Good adaptation though.
-Zz
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On 11/25/2010 9:14 AM, Zz Yzx wrote:

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Texas has produced it's share of despicable politicians but Delay wins the prize.
Max
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wrote:

The idiot gets an "A" in Irony with the last sentence in this most quotable of statements:
"This is an abuse of power. It's a miscarriage of justice, and I still maintain that I am innocent. The criminalization of politics undermines our very system and I'm very disappointed in the outcome."
Gall, wot?
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
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Hey, didn't Caesar say "All Gall is divided into three parts: I, me and mine are always right"? If Delay gets hammertime behind the new perspective of bars is anyone taking odds on his repentant apology to the people whom elected him to an office of public trust?
Regards,
EH
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On Thu, 25 Nov 2010 17:40:30 -0800, Larry Jaques wrote:

I especially liked "criminalization of politics" :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I like castration of politicians better
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"George W Frost" wrote:

---------------------------- Sarah would probably agree with you, but then that approach leaves out a whole bunch of politicans.
Lew
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On Fri, 26 Nov 2010 17:19:21 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

Yeah, AS IF!
-- Education should provide the tools for a widening and deepening of life, for increased appreciation of all one sees or experiences. It should equip a person to live life well, to understand what is happening around him, for to live life well one must live life with awareness. -- Louis L'Amour
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

A bit of history here. In 2001 the Texas House consisted of 78 Democrats and 72 Republicans, and Congressional House seats were 17-15 in favor of the Democrats.
DeLay (and others) set out to elect more Republicans to the Texas House so that they could redistrict the Congressional seats more to the benefit of the Republicans.
Sure enough, the 2002 elections resulted in a Republican majority in the Texas House. The state legislature then redistricted the Congressional seats in time for the 2006 elections. The result of this is that the Texas congressional delegation in January will consist of 9 Democrats and 23 Republicans. a shift of eight seats from Democrats to the GOP.
Amongst the machinations (and court challenges) involved in this effort was $190,000 raised by the DeLay group to assist Republican Texas House candidates. Prohibited by law, DeLay's group could not give the money they raised directly to the Republican candidates, but the Republican National Committee could. So DeLay's group donated the money they raised to the RNC and the RNC turned around and gave the money to the Texas Republican Committee (TRC), who, in turn, disbursed it to the candidates.
It was this hop DeLay-RNC-TRC-candidates that got DeLay charged, and subsequently convicted, of money laundering.
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HeyBub wrote:

Further refreshing of my memory reveals that Texas law regarding "money laundering" at the time specified that the money laundered had to be the result of an illegal activity. Inasmuch as the money raised by DeLay's group was in no way the fruit of an illegal effort, I suspect DeLay's convictions will be overturned as a matter of law.
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