O/T: Shredded Pork

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*snip*
Would you care to invite your friends from the wRECk? ;-)
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I'm in northeast CT Come on over.
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No kidding, he would get called every name in the book and they would trace his ISP address back to him so they could shoot him a virus. If they didn't think he was a shit disturber, the nicest thing would be a troll.
I was OK with this kitchen built version, thinking that Lew had mixed up "stewed pork" or maybe "braised pork" or "stewed meat" until I read this:

*GASP*
I would never serve oven stewed pork with store bought barbecue sauce on it as barbecued pork.
"Barbecued" pork is indeed cooked in a pit smoker. I take a butt and put the dry rub on the night before I cook it. I put it in the smoker after I get a steady 250 - 275 degrees (the sweet spot of the day for myWSM) and allow about an hour to hour 15 minutes a pound. You cannot hurry it. Wood and fuel are added as needed. Depending on the butt size (my preference for the pulled pork) I usually have the butt(s) out in about 8 - 10 hours. Butts are pretty forgiving though, and you can cut your cooking times down by raising the temps.
I pull them when the internal temp is about 185 or a little over. OR I use the time honored way of knowing the meat is done when you can slide the bone around easily withing the piece of meat.
No smoke ring - it isn't barbecue. No bark - it isn't barbecue. Cooked in foil - it is stewed or braised, regardless of the heat source. Again, not barbecue.
Cook that butt (or picnic) the right way and pull out that heavily barked piece of smoky heaven. Let it sit for about 1/2 hours. Put it in a large bowl, remove the bone and pull it apart with a couple of forks. Check out Ed's description; it's the classic method for traditional pulled pork. Shredding is just a finer pull.
Folks that eat my pulled pork rarely want any sauce, although I might sneak a variant of Ed's on while I am pulling to add just a lit bit more of spicy flavor.
That as they say, is that. For me personally, no wood smoke, no barbecue. If I can't cook my pig in the smoker, I will wait until I can. Same way with packer brisket. Same way with a chuck roll. Same way with a brisket flat.
But if YOU like it... that's all that counts.
Rober
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The problem for most people is that they have never experienced real barbecue. I was born and raised in the city and barbecue meant putting chicken on the grill with store bought sauce until it burns. Back in the 80's, I had to go to our Durham NC pant for a few days to help a new salesman. The first day he said we'd go to lunch and get some barbecue. I was served a sandwich with this shredded meat with a clear sauce on it. WOW, what a treat. That put me on a quest to find how to make it properly. Some reading, the internet and a lot of practice later I make some good stuff. Amazing stuff and once you've had the real deal, nothing else works.
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RE: Subject
The Smoker Gods have admonished me.
How dare I call what I did "Bar-B-Cue?
Store bought sauce?
Surely you jest.
OK, I stand admonished; however, you play to your audience, which in my case is the unwashed masses when it comes to smoked meat since I don't have access to a smoker.
The unwashed masses liked it.
So lets just call it:
"Oven slow roasted pig, covered with foil, then shredded and drowned in store bought bar-b-cue sauce, served open face on a bun".
Any way you describe it, It got the job done.
Who knows, maybe there is a smoker in my future<G>.
Lew
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Too bad you did not start with a 10 pound butt, that would have been funnier.
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Yeah, but airport security won't allow big butts
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In forth:

no smoke complete blasphemy<g>
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Currently underway at Chez Balderstone:
http://www.balderstone.ca/IMG_0936.JPG
http://www.balderstone.ca/IMG_0934.JPG
http://www.balderstone.ca/IMG_0935.JPG
Five pound pork shoulder, dry rub of salt, pepper, cumin, cloves.
Rosemary spears inserted.
Hickory, mesquite and apple wood.
In the smoker at noon, pulled pork sandwiches about 7:00.
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That last photo looks like your oven is all smoky.
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Indeed...
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In wrote:

looks good I've got a #5 #7 & #8 sittin in the fridge rubbed w/cayene,Bsugar,garlic,salt,cumin,smoked paprika and some other stuff. They'll be goin on in the morning with some ribs and snausages. snausage fer lunch, pulled pork and ribs fer dinner And smoked only with pecan.
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On 9/5/2009 5:41 PM Lew Hodgett spake thus:
[snip]

OK, time for my $0.02. DISCLAIMER: I am a barbecue dummy. Don't know nuttin' about it, really, except that, well, it tastes really good if done right.
Case in point: I used to live in East Palo Alto. (Those familiar with the San Francisco Bay Area will know the significance of that place.) In our little "downtown" area, now bulldozed, was a great temple of barbecue, Goldie's. Out in back, Goldie had this amazing machine. At least that's what I called it. It was a big black contraption, welded up out of 55-gallon drums and such.
What happened within that contraption was always a mystery to me. The only way I could describe it was thus: in one end went chickens, firewood (oak) and other substances. Out the other end came the most sublime food one could ever hope to taste. Somewhere in the middle, smoke was involved.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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"David Nebenzahl" wrote:

There is an old joke about how you barbecue ribs.
"First you steal a shoping cart and a 20 gallon drum..."
When I was back in Cleveland and you wanted good ribs, in the summer time you went to the "hood".
Quite common to find a homemade grill built on a shopping cart with one half of a drum holding the hot coals and the other above it with the ribs.
These rigs were common on the sidewalk in the summer time.
You could find ribs for lunch, but the later in the day, the more ribs that were ready.
Late in the afternoon, not uncommon to go to the "hood", buy a couple of racks of ribs and head home for dinner.
Lew
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