O/T: One Down

Page 11 of 14  
Nonny said:

D'oh! Come to think of it, you're right!
Who the hell has time to proofreed this crap anyway?
Greg G.
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Lew Hodgett said:

Well, I won't go that far, but they could put away the guys I know.
Greg G.
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Lew Hodgett said:

Probably worked out for the best considering the corruption prevalent during that time.

Yepper, and far nicer than lawyers, as a group.

I thought Gund, the founder, was dead at that point and was a philanthropist. Went to look it up and found an interesting but wordy article you might not have read. Mob hits, informants, political wrangling - they could make a movie out of this stuff.
http://www.freetimes.com/stories/15/9/the-mafia-plot-to-kill-dennis-kucinich
I'm beginning to like this guy more and more...

Well, here is why - apparently the same reasons I object to this turd:
http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/11927
And his wife - not partial to redheads but...
Greg G.
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Greg G." wrote:

Shondor, Danny Green (AKA: Irish Mafia), the Teamsters, the Lettuce mafia, not to mention the boys from Youngstown.
Bombs were popular back then.
Jackie Presser (Teamsters) was an FBI informant.
The unions had a strangle hold on almost everything at the time that the mafia didn't want.
Probably no more than any other major city like Chicago or Detroit.

The Gund Foundation was going strong but Dennis brought out the heavy hitters. He died a few years later.

Reading that brings back names and places I had long forgotten.

A leopard doesn't change it's spots and neither will Dennis.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett said:

Not having grown up in a union area, I missed the shit they were involved in and where much of the animosity towards them stemmed from. Don't have a problem with workers organizing for a united voice, but many unions, like most hired guns, seem to end up thoroughly corrupt.
All we had were the Dixie Mafia - same premise, different people. Now it's all one homogenous mess of mobsters from all over.

That's comforting to know. :-o

And probably could have done without the reminder, eh?

Is that a good thing? Being couched in that vernacular makes me uneasy...
Greg G.
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Greg G." wrote:

With Dennis, you know what you have.
There are over 100 millionaires in Congress.
Dennis will never be one unless a rich relative comes out of the wood work and leaves him the money.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett said:

A mafia mark with a hot wife? ;-) Didn't know if you had some latent dirt on the guy.

At least - and if K-Street has anything to do with it, more every day.

Good enough. Cue the theme song from "The Untouchables."
More and more it seems that all the infighting and partisan squabbling is just public cover for who ends up collecting the bribe money. Feh.
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote:

If they can just "save one child" it will all have been worth it.
--
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Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
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Tim Daneliuk said:

<sigh...>
Greg G.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Way more than that - 44% or 237.

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Doug Winterburn wrote:

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Rita and Neil Ward wrote:

http://www.opensecrets.org/pfds/overview.php?type=W&year 08
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My grandfather was jailed for going on strike in his youth. A decent man who was prepared to stand by his principles. Ultimately, he went into politics. Instilled in the family that standing up for what you believed in was the only way to live. Ironically, standing by my principles, led me in the opposite direction. I was doing some contract work for an employer who paid better than anyone in the construction industry and treated his employees as if they were family. The construction union gained access to that particular site through a sweetheart deal with the prime contractor. Compulsory unionism had by then been outlawed. (HA! Sure it had.) Some of my employers people joined up, each for their own reasons. Myself and a couple of others opted not to. So then the games began. After another week, I was the only holdout. The daily visits from the union organiser included conversations along the lines of, "We'd really like you to join us, we would never force you to, just remember, you have a choice." Then the crap started. Two or three times a day, they pulled a stop work meeting. The entire site was involved. Immediately before each stop work, the organiser would come to me and let me know that there was going to be a problem but he wanted to personally assure me that it had nothing to do with me not being a union member. Riiiiight! The prime contractor asked my employer to remove me, he declined and get this! - the union rep said if I was removed from site they would strike over that - because they supported a man's right to free choice! After a week, I capitulated and joined up. If not, I believe they would have sent my employer broke. I then immediately resigned my position, - that was perfectly ok, - as a union member that was my right! I've refused to work on any site that has union involvement from that day on. Looking back, I'm not sure who I'm angrier with, - the union for their corrupt tactics, - or myself for my lack of balls in giving in to them. I somehow suspect it's the latter. : )
diggerop
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diggerop said:

And this was in AU. or have you lived in the US? Never joined or had the desire to join a union, even if they had been prevalent in this area. Figured I could negotiate a better deal on my own behalf anyway. Most of my employers in the past were small businesses and I liked it that way. Like you said, more like family. Had a few friends in the Brotherhood of Electrical workers and have know a few pipefitters in the Navy shipyards but didn't keep up with much of what went on there.
At one time, they served a purpose and helped improve conditions for some mightily downtrodden workers. Self-serving thugs are not something I cater too, however. Even the NEA is suspect at this point.
Standing up for principles has bitten me in the ass more times that I care to count, and I don't seem to ever learn from my... mistakes? The minute ANY arm twisting starts I become immotile and my middle digit seems to stand to attention on it's own. As for your final quandary, I suspect it's that latter as well.
But of all the union and professional groups in existence, the worst one I've seen yet are the "Brothers and Sisters of the Bar." Crikey!
Greg G.
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This was in Aus. There certainly was a need for unionism earlier last century, but then the pendulum swung the other way. (As it seems to with most reforms.) By the time I hit the workforce, union power was enormous. It had complete political power over the Labor Party. (Still has large influence.) Many major industries were "no ticket - no start" jobs. These included shearers,mining, forestry, rail, building, maritime and waterside workers. (Stevedores)
Much of their power has been broken, partly by investigative commissions into the massive corruption that existed and partly by falling membership as Aussie workers incomes rose over the last couple of decades and shortages of labour caused employers to offer wages and benefits far above what the unions had established. - An example is mining, where I have worked for many years and where my wife still works. A union rep on a membership drive would a hard time convincing workers to join up for better pay and conditions when the people he is talking to are on incomes of $130 - $160,000 p.a. work 2 weeks on and two weeks off, get flown to and from the site in jet aircraft, get everything provided at work, - food, clothing, entertainment. The most common expression a union rep would hear on a minesite these days would go something like, "Piss off, you parasite bastard" ..... or even something impolite.... : )
diggerop
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diggerop wrote:

Holy crap did _I_ ever go into the wrong field.

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J. Clarke said:

That's what I was thinking... Do they hire old farts over 50? I've wanted to live in Oz for decades - just for a change of pace.
Greg G.
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Yes they do. Standard entry path without prior skills is as a haulpak operator. (Dumptruck weighing anywhere between 100 and 240 tons empty and 185 and 480 tons loaded.) Need to be fit and healthy. Need to be able to cope with working a week of 12 hour days followed by a week of 12 hour nights. Need to be able to do as you are told. It gets *really, really* mind numbingly boring. Lots of people try it and can't hack it for a variety of reasons.
Not easy for older people without prior mining experience to get in when things are static, but the whole industry, gold, nickel and iron ore along with huge new natural gas developments is gathering pace for what they are saying is an even bigger boom than the last. We don't have the people to cope with that, so we'll train new ones. One of the main qualifications when there are huge labour shortages is having a heartbeat. : ) One of our more common sources of operators has traditionally been Kiwi's, but the bastards are already all over here now. (I hope the last one to leave NZ remembered to turn the lights out : )
diggerop
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diggerop wrote:

Always wanted to drive one of those things.

Need to get back in shape--if I can I might just apply for this.

Actually that's not too bad for me--sometimes I think I'm a Martian with a 25 hour biological clock.

Now that's been a problem for me, but mostly in an office setting where I was supposed to be a decision maker and others with less information would overrule me.

That actually appeals a bit.

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