O/T: "Drill Baby Drill"

Page 13 of 15  
Morris Dovey wrote:

Heh!
Check your history. The Railway Express Agency started out as the Pony Express. The REA was in business for over a hundred years - and never made a profit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2010 4:13 PM, HeyBub wrote:

I'm willing to concede the profitability point (even without checking it out) - but my packages always arrived and AFAIK the packages my mom sent always reached their destination intact and on time.
Shipments from the left coast took just under a week - and my most recent order, a set of T-handle metric ball drivers from an outfit in NJ, was projected to spend a full week traveling UPS ground.
From my perspective, it would appear that UPS has leveraged information technology to produce a profit doing the same job at approximately the same performance level delivered by REA in the 1940's...
...except, of course, for coast-to-coast overnight and second-day air. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know about where you are, but around here one hell of a lot of stuff is moved by rail. The containerization process makes it efficient to pack a truck (container) and move it to the freight station, load it and hundreds more onto trains, ship them across country and then back onto trucks to final destinations without ever unloading anything. They even double deck them everywhere that the tunnels and overpasses are all high enough for them to get through. I am sure that we ship one hell of a lot more by rail today than at any other time in history.
Of course, those barges that I see plying the Ohio river put trains to shame in terms of tonnage being shipped by a single vehicle and in energy cost per ton/mile.
Dave Hall
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dhall987 wrote:

Of course a lot of stuff moves by rail: coal, automobiles, lumber, raw materials, etc.
I just received a new battery for my cell phone. It would be foolish to move it by rail. Later this week, I'm expecting a set of ink cartridges for my printer. Same thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would also be foolish for HP to ship a user manual inside several large boxes strapped to a pallet, but that has been documented.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would be even more foolish to put any relevant information in said user manual. Of course there will be warnings that the printer is not for internal consumption or that safety glasses must be worn when operating the computer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Irrelevant, long-haul trucking has taken away a lot of inter-city freight from rail in part because America's rail system sucks. China has recently built 19,000 miles of new high-speed track, they have linked 52 cities with ultra-high-speed trains (faster than anything in Japan or Europe)--and they've done it with our money. But in America it's easier to just throw it on a truck and charge the customer more for freight, investing in new track etc.--too much trouble.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Except -- China offloads goods on the US West Coast, trans-ships them via rail to the East Coasts, then loads them onto ships bound for Europe. Cheaper than shipping westward, apparently.
Your point about infrastructure investment is well-taken. What was it - late '60s --when the rail system collapsed financially? We got ConRail then, just to preserve something of the rail system... Was the collapse the direct result of the Interstate (National Defense) Highway system? Interstates sped the decay of inner cities, certainly, and fueled our thirst for petroleum. Wonder if Eisenhower, could he have seen into the future, still have pushed for the American version of the Autobahns?
It would be nice to have high-speed rail for travel... Not so coincidentally, I live in a small town that celebrates its ties to the past with a brick swath down the middle of Main Street echoing the path of the long-disappeared* Interurban, electric commuter trains that once carried passengers from one end of Indiana to the other.
*1890-1941, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Railroad; http://www.davesrailpix.com/odds/in/htm/itt06.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2010 9:54 PM, Steve wrote:

I think Ike was dismayed by the poor quality of roads in his younger days and was determined that we should have a better way to move troops and materiel around the country - much more than he was interested in a (then) futuristic highway system.

Interesting. I worked for the C&EI RR after I got out of the Army until school started in the fall. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%26EI
and a decade earlier did a weekly commute via the South Shore Line from home in Hammond (Indiana) to the Art Institute in Chicago. I can still hear the train home being announced at Chicago's Van Buren Street Station: "Hegewisch, Hammond, East Chicago and Gary...track 2, all aboard!" on world's worst PA system. :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Shore_Line_%28NICTD%29
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DGDevin wrote:

Yep. But help is on the way. With just a bit of global warming, the Northwest Passage will be open year 'round, significantly lowering the cost to ship Chinese goods to Europe.
Could this be why China is opening up at least one new coal-fired power plant per week?
Nah, couldn't be...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have been going on about this for the last 40 years. Two of my three daughters work at nuclear power stations, one even teaches operational safety procedures. But as long as the NIMBY's keep their heads up their asses and refuse to look at the whole potential objectively, it will be an uphill battle. Somehow, they think it involves little Nagasaki's in bottles. It is the most endurable, safe methods we know of. That is, in base- load applications. Peak generation still needs to be addressed and so far I ike the advances in cogens. Natural Gas that is. Other sources such as wind and solar are great solutions, again cyclic, but the NIMBY's are already bitching because some windmill knocked a spotted owl out of the sky.... but they will drive their Prius chemical petrie dishes along God's highway. Nuclear for base load generation in part for a new railway network, and nuclear for making hydrogen for automotive fuel cells.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Somebody wrote:

Bullshit.
CNG comes to mind as a short term solution. =========================="Robatoy" wrote:
I have been going on about this for the last 40 years. Two of my three daughters work at nuclear power stations, one even teaches operational safety procedures. But as long as the NIMBY's keep their heads up their asses and refuse to look at the whole potential objectively, it will be an uphill battle. Somehow, they think it involves little Nagasaki's in bottles. ------------------------------------------ When the industry resolves the waste issues, I'm all ears.
BTW, Yucca mountain doesn't cut it.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2010 10:41 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Try again. Energy is required to "move" anything (please see a high school physics text to explain why). The majority of energy in the US today is produced from some kind of fossil fuel. It may not literally require oil, but it definitely comes down to dead dinos somehow.

You mean as opposed to the non-byproducts of fossil fuels? The waste problem has long ago been solved, and, sorry, but Yucca is an excellent solution to the problem.
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed again. (I am going to keep agreeing if for no reason other than for you to start questioning yourself..<G>)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2010 1:07 PM, Robatoy wrote:

I feel so dirty.
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stop hugging your mistress.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2010 1:36 PM, Robatoy wrote:

I was hugging *yours* ... and she needs to be sheared.
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That will teach you to covet another man's ass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2010 4:43 PM, Robatoy wrote:

:-)
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tim Daneliuk snipped-for-privacy@tundraware.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
> Somebody wrote:

CNG is available on USA soil, no need to import it thus a few megabucks are not sent to the Middle East to buy crude.
CNG provides a short term solution, in the order of 20 years while alternate renewable sources are developed for the transportation segment. ----------------------------------------------

A single fuck up in the nuclear business is three too many, thus Yucca doesn't pass muster.
Same applies to off shore drilling as we are seeing right now in the Gulf Of Mexico.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.