O/T: "Drill Baby Drill"

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The silence if deafening from the "Drill Baby Drill" crowd.
At least there is one small bright spot in this man made tragedy.
Lew
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From a Halliburton press kit:
"Halliburton continues to assist in efforts to identify the factors that may have lead up to the disaster, but it is premature and irresponsible to speculate on any specific causal issues." Is a company that very well may have been responsible for the loss of 11 human lives and a massive economic/ecological disaster really lecturing us not to speculate on the catastrophe’s causes? ==============
Let the blames begin!
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

What ya' want...I see no reason for shutting anything down...any venture w/ reward has risk. Once the event analysis is done, whatever is learned will be extended.
--
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Yeah, but wouldn't it be great if some of theis high-priced "talent" could think this shit through before hand? Or maybe we just misheard it all -- and it was "Spill, baby, spill!"
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They can and do think of everything. Just as the Titanic is unsinkable, every engineering possibility will be considered.
As long as humans engineer and build things, they will continue to break.
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I recall reading in early news articles of this incident, that BP had considered an event of this scale and nature in their risk analysis to create a response plan, but discarded it as they considered it extremely unlikely to occur - their high priced talent crossed it off the list of possible occurrences.
When a company puts an oil rig in place to exercise its American rights license, do they file a disaster / reaction plan with some US Agency ? And if so, does that Agency review the plan and respond with an acceptance or denial of permission to proceed with drilling?
Now for my cynical thoughts on this ... If there is, does said Agency have any authority or is toothless administrative appendage? If there is no Agency, look at the opportunity to create new employment ! If there is such an Agency, maybe there will be some restructuring happening soon, with some replacement hirings.
said:

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On 5/2/2010 10:53 PM, Matt wrote:

Or maybe calmer heads will prevail and instead of looking for excuses to create new boondoggles or axe the blameless, they'll figure out what went wrong and fix the design of the BOP so that it doesn't happen again.

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I'm a cynic. As long as the BOP gadgets are mechanical, a large enough explosion will render them useless. Redundancy can only be carried to the nth degree.
I'd venture to guess that when the real causes of the disaster have been pinpointed, more redundancy and remedial actions will be taken. I'm neither in favor nor totally against drilling, but this disaster shouldn't happen again.
One good thing may be that in the armer Gulf more of the sticky and toxic components will evaporate before getting into the ecosystems. (I can hope, can't I?).
--
Best regards
Han
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On 5/3/2010 6:42 AM, Han wrote:

Bingo. There is no machine that cannot be broken. Never has been and never will be.
But what went bust this time can be allowed for in future designs. Which means that next time it will go bust in some other way.

Not sure how you can do redundancy though--have two BOPs stacked? Bring a second manufacturer into the game so that they are completely different designs with different points of failure? What will happen then is that one will break in an unanticipated way that blocks the operation of the other.
And then there's the possibility of deliberate sabotage.

Nahh, when the volatiles evaporate, that's when the sticky stuff gets _real_ sticky. And if you've lived in that area you'll have experienced slowly sinking into a paved road if you stand still too long.
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When Drake sailed up the west coast, he reputedly mentioned an oil slick more than a hundred miles long off what is now Santa Barbara. Nature will do quite well on its own:
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/05/15/natural-petroleum-seeps-release-equivalent-of-eight-to-80-exxon-valdez-oil-spills/
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wrote the following:

"Why aren't enviros out there sucking it all up?" I wonder.
I remember getting tar on my feet in Oceanside, CA from the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill. It was a nuisance for over a year.
-- Courage is the power to let go of the familiar. -- Raymond Lindquist
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As a child I spent time on the Dutch North Sea beaches. Dad carried a bottle of turpentine or some such so we could was the tar of our feet before going home. Those tarballs were probably from fuel oil from the ships going by, but were annoying nevertheless. Never thought about them as particularly toxic when they were tar balls. Really liquid oil, like what floated on the Rhine were we swam, that was something else ...
--
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Han
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The hotels in Santa Barbara have tar remover along with the shampoo and soap.
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On 5/3/2010 9:18 PM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

However the oil in Santa Barbara is from a purely natural source.
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So is the oil in the Gulf.
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On 5/3/2010 11:05 PM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

The oil in Santa Barbara was there before humans, it is not the result of drilling or industry or any other activity of humans.
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As is the oil in the Gulf. Both sources have been drilled.
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On 5/4/2010 3:15 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

Check again. Santa Barbara has a natural oil seep.
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Please, guys, it is a question of scale only. A little oil doesn't really hurt. Drowning in oil does, whether from natural causes (seeping) or man- made (faulty safety).
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Han
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The Gulf probably has some. In both cases, the oil is Natural. In the case of the current Gulf blowout, the amount of oil is likely a drop in the bucket when compared to natural leakage.
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