O/T: Abby Sunderland Rescued!

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On 6/13/2010 1:10 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

So what leads you to believe that her navigational skills were insufficient to the task of hitting Australia?
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$200K worth of equipment.
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On 6/14/2010 4:15 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

I guess the US Navy's skills aren't up to that task either then.
But what leads you to believe that the carried $200K worth of navigation equipment.
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 00:15:50 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Yes, she still had the option of drifting around until she ran out of food and water.
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 18:45:09 -0700, "Lobby Dosser"

Not in those conditions, he didn't.
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Correct.
Consider then, Shackleton.
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'scuse me, what scientific observations or previously unachieved endeavors was Abby aiming for? Other than being the youngest to do something.
--
Best regards
Han
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None.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Oh, yeah, right! :(
Call me cynical, but I don't think this girl would have a clue how to even begin to do the first or have any idea how to sail w/o the electronics to tell here where land might even be...
--
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dpb wrote: ...

And, just to make it clear, no, this old wheat farmer wouldn't have a clue, either, and ain't clamin' would've made it as far as she did, even (but then again, woulda' known better as well).
I just don't think she's ever sailed enough w/o all the modern appurtenances to have a even a ghost of a chance w/o 'em if more than a short distance away from shore what more w/ in a disabled boat...
--
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On 6/13/2010 2:27 PM, dpb wrote:

The only "modern appurtenance" she needed and didn't have was a stick of wood.
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On 6/13/2010 2:17 PM, dpb wrote:

Maybe, maybe not. The thing is, you don't know her.
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J. Clarke wrote:

That's true I don't know her -- what I do know is that she's only 16, not a seasoned sailor w/ 20 years' experience behind her to draw on from which to improvise. I also know she ignored advice to reschedule departure to avoid being where she was this time of year which is notoriously bad weather period for the area.
--
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On 6/13/2010 8:56 PM, dpb wrote:

Doesn't take 20 years experience, it takes a modicum of mechanical aptitude. And supposedly she has done a good deal of singlehanded ocean sailing prior to this, so she's more "seasoned" than many.

Which reflects on her judgment but not on her ability to tie ropes and cloth to a stick of wood (or aluminum or carbon fiber or unobtainium or whatever else the pieces she has dragging in the water alongside the boat are made of).

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Now picture the captain of the fishing vessel that saved her, tangled and drowning in that mess because some California teen had a 'dream'.
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On 6/14/2010 4:19 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

Why would the "captain of a fishing vessel" be "tangled and drowning in that mess" and what specific "mess" would this be? And would it make a difference if it was the rigging of the US Coast Guard Cutter Eagle in which he was "tangled and drowning"? You seem to be arguing against all use of sailing vessels.
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J. Clarke wrote: ...

...
Which raises the question of how suitable is all the new material of which the boat was made for hand jury-rigging to begin with and what tools and other facilities did she (a not very big) 16 yr old girl have to manhandle wet rigging in rough seas with which to do this feat of engineering legerdemain? And once done, does she have a clue where she is or where is shortest suitable landfall and how's her hand navigation skill, etc., etc., etc. ...
I think she was a _very_ lucky young lady.
Plucky, yes, apparently reasonably competent sailor in her element of well-equipped boat w/ functional electronics, etc., but foolhardy and as yet unprepared for the situation she put herself in.
Fortunate there was somebody in the neighborhood, the seas calmed to a certain amount before she was totally capsized and in the drink herself separated from the boat and the emergency transponder worked.
--
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On 6/14/2010 10:08 AM, dpb wrote:

Well, wet stainless doesn't handle a lot different from dry stainless and one hopes that she has a few appropriately sized wire rope clips on hand.
As to having a clue where she is, she lost her mast, not her GPS. If you think that GPS needs some kind of mast, you've never actually handled one.

Of course you have examined her at some length on these matters.

Why would a boat with a heavy keel and no mast be "totally capsized"?

Why would she be "separated from the boat"? It has been customery for decades for singlehanders to wear tethers.
> and the emergency transponder worked.
What "transponder"? She has not one but two emergency position indicating radio transmitters, neither of which is a "transponder". It would have been quite remarkable for both of them to fail.

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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 21:17:51 -0400, "J. Clarke"

You have read too many fictitious adventure novels, dude. The safest thing for her to do with what was in the water would be to cut it free so it would either sink or drift away - and not poke holes in her boat. Hulk Hogan would not be able to raise that mast and jury rig it - WHILE ON DRY LAND. The chances of her even getting that mast back on board the boat were zero. It would have been a very dangerous and stupid thing to even attempt.
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On Jun 14, 8:41am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

We chewed on this a bit over the weekend's barbecue and cigars.
Without all the speculation about remasting (thanks Hollywood!) the boat, I am wondering how she would now deal with the speculative "debris" or "material to be repurposed" mentioned. Would she cut it away, or would she use the "aluminum or carbon fiber or unobtainium or whatever else the pieces she has dragging in the water alongside the boat" to rehab/rework the boat into something she could sail, steer and navigate. Did she have the necessary tools to do so?
I have a friend that used to sail/race yachts competitively. While he had no money, he worked on the boats at a sailboat shop and they took him along as a hand. Once proficient, he made nice weekend money in the friendly regattas between held on the larger lakes around here.
I asked him what he thought about all of this... not much.
But then I posed JC's opine about righting a boat, chopping through debris, rigging a mast from broken material and then sailing away to a safe port.
I though he was going to spill his beer he was laughing so hard.
He reviewed the facts for me. OK... so this 16 year old 125 pound kid is going to *right* a dismasted 40' boat all by herself in the middle of the ocean?
She will swim around in the rigging, sails, fittings and broken mast to clear the wreckage. The she will have to right a boat that is as long as three of your pickups >>by herself<<, then saw up a carbon fiber mast, drill holes into the mast or tie off to hold fittings, cut a new sail to size from the old one, fabricate hard on the sail to attach it to the rigging, re-rig the sail, hoist it up and then set off for a port? All of this alone? And she thinks this new contraption will be navigable?
Do you know how tall a mast is on those boats? (No... I am no sailor). About 60 ft or so. Do you know what it would take to get that wet, submerged sail out of the water by itself? (no...) Then imagine bobbing up and down in the rigging, a loose mast (possibly broken) 60' away from your flotation while trying to get all that other cutting, sawing, fitting, tying off and other crap done.
"Have you ever even tried to right a tipped boat of any size, Robert?"
Nope.
He assured me I would see the lunacy of the above mentioned tasks I tried to right is little 20' skimmer he uses on the local lakes.
Not to be a dream stealer or a naysayer, I told him that on this newsgroup, all things were possible. At least to some.
He promised me that he would pay good money to see a teenage girl right a 40' boat with a 60' sail on or off it, then reattach a mast of sorts and sail away.
I was thinking.... now THAT would be your book, movie and speaking engagements...
I now think she may have been more in her right mind than I thought. The smartest thing she did was call it off and MANUALLY fire off her rescue beacons.
Robert
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