NYW Worktable w/casters - anyone remember how it worked?

I remember a Norm special on a plywood worktable used in the TV studio that had a nice way of locking in some casters to allow the table to roll. If I recall, there were some hinged braces that dropped down to lock the casters in place. Each end of the table had these braces hinged on a leg and tied together with a piece of rope. In action one would raise the table and that would release the braces to drop down under gravity. This would then lock the casters which were attached to a piece of plywood that ran front to back and pivoted somehow. To allow the table to be stationary you simply pulled the braces out using the rope and moved the casters up and away. Only thing is I cannot find the plans on the NYW site, nor a reference to the table. Anyone remember this and how the lock worked?
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It was the worktable and clamp cart episode. link below.
http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct3.cgi?0207

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Mark Simon wrote:

Rip off europe strikes again, $10 US 10 UK
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wrote:

so the dollar being in the toilet is somehow europe's fault?
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Regardless to purchase in Europe you buy from an European company. That company sets the European price.
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Ok, the Europe dollar comment wasn't in my post. I don't even know how the dollar compares to the Euro. Wonder how that got attached?

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I don't remember when the wasn't worth more than the dollar.

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calmly ranted:

Look closely at the photos, discern the mechanism, build it yourself without his bloody plans.
"We doan need no steenkeeng planz." he said, SierraMadreically.
------------------------------------------------- - Boldly going - * Wondrous Website Design - nowhere. - * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------
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wrote:

Episode #1407 (or 0207, depending on which numbering scheme they're using). The episode was entitled "Work Table & Clamp Stand." It might have been the clamp stand that threw you off on your search.
As far as the caster assembly, it consisted of a slab of wood across the two end legs, hinged along the axis of a stretcher. On it were mounted two swivel casters. On the inside of the legs were two plates, also hinged.
When the table was lifted on the end, the hinged caster plate came down, and the two side plates came down against the leg, preventing the caster plate from folding back up.
The string was to pull up the side plates allowing the casters to fold up when you wanted to spot the table someplace.
I really need to figure out how to do vid caps from my tape of the episode and put it on my webpage. It's so much easier to see the assembly than it is to describe it.
I hope this helps.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Thanks everyone!!
DIYGUY wrote:

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DIYGUY said:

I have captured all the episodes on DVD. I'll take a screen shot of one frame showing the construction and post it on a.b.p.w. RE: CASTERS
FWIW,
Greg G.
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I built a slightly smaller version (60x30) to fit my shop and love it. I also put some drawers below the top by adding some sides between the legs to mount slides. I really like using it for case assembly. I can put the case on the table and spin the whole table around quickly to cinch clamps or check for square. Easier than trying to move the project. And being able to move it easily makes for quick floor clean up. I had a stationary bench/table before that was my primary assembly area and it always had dust and shavings below it that were too hard to get to (Ah! my aching back). Also when the casters are retracted it is very sturdy. Especially if the assembly project on top has some heft to it.
Anyway it's been a great addition. And it can easily be built in a weekend. Mark
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I built a slightly smaller version (60x30) to fit my shop and love it. I also put some drawers below the top by adding some sides between the legs to mount slides. I really like using it for case assembly. I can put the case on the table and spin the whole table around quickly to cinch clamps or check for square. Easier than trying to move the project. And being able to move it easily makes for quick floor clean up. I had a stationary bench/table before that was my primary assembly area and it always had dust and shavings below it that were too hard to get to (Ah! my aching back). Also when the casters are retracted it is very sturdy. Especially if the assembly project on top has some heft to it.
Anyway it's been a great addition. And it can easily be built in a weekend. Mark
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Just a word of thanks for everyone who pitched in to help me out. I have to publicly thank Greg G. for his generous support with pix. There is no substitute for that. As an aside - I wanted to use the mechanism on a mobile base I plan to put under my jointer. It struck me as a very good way of recycling the idea into a new use. If anyone has other thoughts on constructing a mobile base I would like to hear them as well ...
DIYGUY wrote:

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DIYGUY said:

You're most welcome. Hope it all works out! It wasn't the best of pictures, but one that did illustrate most of the dynamics involved.
I used a similar but re-engineered system for hidden casters on the new router table I built. It was just too darned heavy to move without them!
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Sorry, but I seem to have joined in late in this thread. I have a router table top that I'm building a cabinet for which will mount on a metal workstand base. I NEED to be able to wheel this contraption in and out a too-small workspace. Is there any chance you could e-mail me any photos you have of both of the above setups? Thanks.
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G.E.R.R.Y. said:

The table picture should still be in a.b.p.w. The router table is similar, except that instead of two boards on each side that hold the wheel platform in place, there is a sliding wooden support that spans the cabinet. You lift the cabinet, the wheels drop, and you slide the chamfered board into place to hold it up against the cabinet bottom. Due to the extra weight, I felt the additional support would be needed, and the space is limited as well. The sliding support is actuated by a threaded rod that extends from the side of the cabinet. It is all completely hidden, except for the knobs. There is only 3" of space under the cabinet, roughly the height of the toe kick.
I'm not sure either of these designs would be appropriate for a metal stand, however. You might be better off with a HTC mobil base.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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What is an HTC?
Gerry
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G.E.R.R.Y. wrote:

Gerry...
HTC is the name of the manufacturer.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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