Novice Seeking Advice

I'm interesting in purchasing a spiral saw......... a Rotozip or Dremel Advantage. My use will include cutting wallboard and cut off saw. These are appealing to me because both are available with a plunge router attachment and flex shaft .I don't believe the dremel has a cut off saw like the "zip" for Rotozip. I'm not a "heavy" user, but additional functions of router, circle cutting , etc. would be "nice to have".
Any advice re advantages of one vs the other? Appreciate any input you're willing to provide.
Happy Holidays
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I have the dremel, and have seen the rotozip.... I think it has MORE POWER.... My dremel came with a cut off saw, so....
I think that the rotozip would be more to your needs, the dremel is strictly craft and for detail work.... The rotozip is a half-step up in terms of robustness, if that's a word.... Anything more than light use would call for a more appropriately sized tool, IMHO...
I do know that the dremel is limited to 1/8" bits, which you *aint* gonna find anywhere, 'cept dremel, and at a price I might add... If the rotozip has a 1/4 collet, you could at least use small shank router bits.
I have used my dremel tool as a router and been *pretty happy* with it in that capacity. It really shines for small works....
HTH,
John Moorhead Lakeport, CA

are
"zip"
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John,
Dremel came out with the Advantage model and it has a 4.5a motor which is the same as my PC 310 router as I recall. I have the Advantage and most of the attachments now. The reason I went with it over the RotoZip was a little recall they had because of a design flaw in the handle - it would come off while using it...
Money wise, they're about the same now since the Advantage is packaged as a kit with the cable and the plunge router adapter. It also comes with both a 1/8" and 1/4" collet which I used quite a bit when I made the French door set for my niece.
Go with the one that has all the options you will need. They both are about equal in quality from what I can see and have read.
Bob S.
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Dewalt and rotozip bits also fit the dremel tool. Where to buy? Where else, Home Depot.(No affiliation) Not the greatest price but the tool crib seems to carry a few different kinds.
John

are
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they are now made by the same company. I just finished a lot of drywall work and it broke (Rotozip)neat the end. It was the collet release that broke. Dremel Inc replaced the whole thing without any problems very quick.
len.

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On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 22:07:17 -0500, "Grindstone"

I use a Rotozip occasionally for drywall, but I have a couple problems with it. 1) It spews gypsum dust like crazy! Very messy. and 2) very difficult to move in a straight line (free-hand, anyway). Maybe I'm doing something wrong?
-- Bill W.
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Regarding #1, there -is- a solution. There is a 'dust collector' attachment for the RotoZip -- best source of supply I've found is SEARS. they stock it for their house-branded version of the RotoZip. Takes standard 1-1/4" 'vacuum cleaner" type hose (I have the "Hang Up" Shop Vac, that comes with an 18' 1-1/4" hose). Makes an *incredible* difference! For all practical purposes, the gizmo is now 'dust free' -- I'm known to cut in the _ceiling_ w/o either a face shield, or even a dust mask.
As for $#2, "practice makes perfect". <grin> And if it's a long cut, a guide rail helps *a*lot*.
It is *definitely* a "Clint Eastwood / Dirty Harry" class of tool --
"A man's gotta know it's limitations"
*chortle*
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:09:45 -0800, Bill Warner

Drywall dust clogs most filters to vacs very quickly, although there are covers you can buy. I have installed a lot of drywall and still rely on a $4 drywall saw. It cuts fast and easy, has not worn out after 14 years, and generates very little dust.
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Phisherman wrote:

I have an old Rainbow vacuum cleaner. The Rainbow is one helluva vacuum that catches just about everything that goes through it's water bath filter. It can be left running in a clean area and the water will turn gray. I use this vacuum about everywhere.
It was a PITA to sand drywall with the right hand and chase the sanding pad with the left but it almost eliminated dust in the house. There is a bit of foaming and it doesn't have the greatest capacity but its better than the alternative.
I also use the Rainbow with the miter saw, it fits well enough in the dust bag port. It sucks up dust so well dust isn't a concern.
All I have to do now is work out a method of attaching it to the other portable WW tools.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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