Not many wood posts, here's one

I found some decent poplar at a decent price locally (central Florida). I'm working on my screen porch and need a molding at the top to hide the juncture of wall drywall (new) and ceiling drywall (done long ago). The poplar will be it so I'm off to my shop to join an edge, rip and surface.
Boring post? Yeah, but at least I'm chopping wood :)
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dadiOH
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Be sure to prime and paint that piece as poplar does not hold up well out doors especially if it is humid.
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On 8/19/2009 7:06 AM dadiOH spake thus:

Boring? No, ripping good, I'd say!
[boom-TISH]
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Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Refreshing. Thx.
Just bought some poplar myself but no idea if it was good price or not. Forgot to look. It also is for a home project. I am building a fireplace surround with fluted columns, etc and mantle to hide badly done brick work (not mine, it came that way). I am building it mostly out of MDF but thought the actual mantel shelf should be real wood to stand up a little better. Yeah poplar is soft but it will hold up better than MDF would and it won't take much abuse.
It all gets painted white when I am done.
The main reason I am excited about this project is I am going to buy a Bosch 1250DEVS 6 amp orbital sander to sand the paint off of the bricks that will be left exposed. I have been jonsing for one of these monster sanders for a long time and I found a local tool supply house that has them in stock. I have a few other projects lined up for this bad boy as well.

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The main reason I am excited about this project is I am going to buy a Bosch 1250DEVS 6 amp orbital sander to sand the paint off of the bricks that will be left exposed. I have been jonsing for one of these monster sanders for a long time and I found a local tool supply house that has them in stock. I have a few other projects lined up for this bad boy as well.
Hopefully you don't have paint in the joints.
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Yes I do and I have a couple of ideas about that.
1. Try using the edge of the sander pad. The joints are standard width, probably close to 1/2" or more and the grout wasn't wiped to be to deep.
2. If this is only partly succesfull or not succesfull, I'll make a bullnosed sanding block and try by hand.
3. Try paint remover
4. Try wire brush attachment on corder drill
5. Grout over roughed up but not totally removed paint
6. Paint the grout lines gray.
I did a test sanding of the flat part of the bricks with a palm sander and it came of clean and easy but took some time. So the big sander will speed that up.
I am also only leaqving exposed a small portion of the existing brick. Here is a picture. I have made lots of changes to the design but this does show the exposed brick as it will be.
http://www.sonomaproducts.com/Graphics/fireplace.JPG

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I like these three. Alternatively, get a cat and tell s/he, "NEVER SCRATCH HERE!" :) ____________

Argggg...
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dadiOH
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7. Sand Blast?
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writes:

there is a sand blaster that can be used in this situation. it has both a blaster and a vacuum, so the dust/residue go elsewhere instead of into the local atmosphere. you do need a hepa filter on whatever you're using to suck though.
dags 'vacuum sand blaster'
http://badboyblasters.com/id92.html http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?store=snapon-store&item_ID 504&group_ID39
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wrote:

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

WHITE PAINT on a fireplace surround?
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HeyBub wrote:

Yep. Works fine if it's a good fireplace. Unfortunately what passes for a fireplace today would get the builder ridden out of town on a rail in the 1700s.
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J. Clarke wrote,on my timestamp of 20/08/2009 11:15 PM:

Probably mentioning something you're already aware of, but aren't you concerned with MDF giving off fumes when heated by the fireplace? I can't remember off-hand which chemical (formaldehyde?), but I know it's not very healthy. The painting might help contain it, maybe?
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Never really thought about it. I do know that MDF supposedly off gasses formaldyhide (sp?) for a while when new but I didn't think it was forever. Wasn't sure if the newer manufacturing process has eleminated that or if you have to buy special non-formaldi type. Also didn't know that heating it would elevate the effect but it makes sense. Yes it will be painted. Maybe that helps. I also don't think it will really get too much heat, it is back from the opening a bit and I don't plan to have any bonfires.
Last winter here in California, my first in this new house, I didn't even use it for a fire. I will use it this year, at least when entertaining.
If I die or get cancer, I guess I post a warning here.
On a related note to this thread, I ended up using jasoc paint stripper for the face of the bricks and a wire wheel to clean the grout lines of the painted brick. I planned to go all the way to clean brick but there were several layers of different colored paint white, and two different reds and then the lightest red is the brick itself. Plus some carbon deposits on the bricks just above the opening. By just removing 85% of the coverage I ended up with the greatest looking distressed brick. Better than I could ever have planned for.
I'll post pics once I finishing triming and painting the surround.

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Do a Google search on Fireplace Surround and then jump to the images page and it is 50/50 white paint or natural finished wood. As much as I love wood, this little 1,000 sq ft ranch house is just not suited to elaborate woodwork built-ins. I am toning down the complexity of the design to try and fit in with the general style of the house while adding some classic elements of design. The white base boards will also wrap around from the adjacent walls to tie the surround back into room. That is not show in the picture.

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