Normite/Neander, Flat Boarder/Turner

I thought the term "Flat Boarder" was an interesting way to further differentiate a woodworker into a discrete category... For example:
Normite-Flat Boarder Neander-Flat Boarder Normite-Turner Neander-Turner
At various times I've tried them all. However, in recent years I'm mostly a Flat Boarder who wanders between Normite and Neander--often on the same project.
Of all these persuasions of woodworking the toughest thing I ever did was Neander Turning using a spring-pole lathe. Mack Headley set me up and showed me how... Talk about a work out! Not only do you have to "pump" the lathe with one foot while balancing on the other but you can only cut on the down stroke! Compared to Normite Turning it's a lot slower and a lot more physically demanding.
So what are you?
John schizophrenic? ;-)
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On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 23:48:47 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

then we subdivide: sheet goods flat boarder dimensional stock flat boarder

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I'm a woodworker/woodturner. I use what I have which will get the job done.
So take a hint from the census folks - "other."

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On Sun, 20 Jun 2004 23:48:47 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"
|I thought the term "Flat Boarder" was an interesting way to further |differentiate a woodworker into a discrete category... For example: | |Normite-Flat Boarder |Neander-Flat Boarder |Normite-Turner |Neander-Turner | |At various times I've tried them all. However, in recent years I'm mostly a |Flat Boarder who wanders between Normite and Neander--often on the same |project.
[snip]
|So what are you?
Maybe too new to know :-) Don't do any turning and my take on tools is summed up nicely by this quote from Tage Frid:
"A lot of people get romantic about their tools. I don't care about the tools. I use anything that will get the job done. The end result is what counts."
Wes
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Snip

Snip
I very much agree with Mr. Frid and Wes. Although I enjoy my tools and take good care of them, I would not hesitate in the destruction and or modification of them in order to make them do what I want them to do for me.
Tools by their nature are designed to facilitate the process.
Dave
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wrote:
|Snip | |>|Normite-Flat Boarder |> |Neander-Flat Boarder |> |Normite-Turner |> |Neander-Turner| |> [snip]|> |> |So what are you?| |Snip | |> "A lot of people get romantic about their tools. I don't care about |> the tools. I use anything that will get the job done. The end result |> is what counts." Tage Frid| |I very much agree with Mr. Frid and Wes. Although I enjoy my tools and take |good care of them, I would not hesitate in the destruction and or |modification of them in order to make them do what I want them to do for me.
Reminds me of a story my dad told me. During WW-II (that's the war, not a saw blade) he was a machinist working for Consolidated Aircraft in San Diego. He was running some kind of wet grinder that had a coarse and fine feed wheel and each time a part was inserted the process was to bring in the grinding wheel with the coarse feed as close as possible and then start fine feeding. With the coolant stream and splash shields in the way, it was hard to see the gap between the workpiece and the wheel, so it took a lot of fine feeding.
Being a clever guy, he designed a sliding stop for the coarse feed wheel that could be locked in place with a set screw and he drilled a hole in the carriage and screwed in a bolt for the fixed stop. Once set, returning the grinding wheel close to the workpiece was a snap. His production rate went up a couple of hundred percent.
Somehow, management got wind of this and came down to see what the score was. Dad proudly showed them his trick, fully expecting to get an atta boy. Not to be. They were pissed and ordered him to return the machine to its original state and be happy that they weren't charging him with distruction of government property. Just because there's a war on doesn't mean that you should work efficiently when it's a cost plus contract.
Wes
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Snip |

Nothing much changes when it comes to the narrow-minded knucklehead (probaly a relative of the boss) sub-level manament types.
Dave
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