Norm and safety

Page 1 of 2  
Has anyone else noticed that Norm's safety glasses lack side shields? They don't do much good without them.
Walt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He had side shields originally, but they were just glued on without any brads to hold them, and, well... you can see the result.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@all.interested says...

Too funny.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elrond Hubbard wrote:

No biscuits either....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
walt wrote:

Many safety glasses lack explicit side shields, but are a more stylish "wraparound" type with curved lenses that give similar protection.
Anything with a current CSA approval must provide side impact protection.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They seem to be working though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is an oxymoron to have Norm and safety in the same sentence.
Norm's safety lapses are legendary. I sometimes just cringe when I see him do certain things. Other times I just cover my eyes. My wife finds these thing to be very amusing and always asks me to explain what he is doing wrong.
I am certain that many of these things are done for the camera. But I tend to think that anybody who flat out ignores this many safety practices is just old school and really doesn't know about them.
We all know some old fart who does everything wrong, doesn't eat right, drinks too much, etc, etc. And they outlive all of us and have a good life. I think that Norm fits into that catagory.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Norm's not bad at all compared to the guys at woodworkingonline.com. I think they make great videos but I've literally cringed during a few of their demonstrations. Most of it from people running their hands too close to the blade. I suppose it could look safer in real life than on camera though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 20:19:09 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

He always has that disclaimer that the guard has been removed for TV. My guess he hasn't seen that guard since he set up his saw.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"> He always has that disclaimer that the guard has been removed for TV.

How many of us do know where the guard for the TS is? I know right where mine is, under the workbench where it is nice and safe. Other tools all have the guards in place and working, but the TS had it' removed the first day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do. It's on my saw and is always there except when I can't use it (ie. non through cuts). Sure it's a bit inconvenient at times but I got past that. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Same with mine. I work safer without the guard on my table saw.
sweet sawdust wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My old Craftsman saw was actually safer without the guard. The splitter/guard support was bent the wrong way, so when you tried to push a piece of wood through the saw it'd cut and then hang up on the guard support, but only enough to put pressure against the piece. We all know what pressure against the piece and thus the blade can lead to...
My new saw actually supports adjusting where the splitter/guard support is in relation to the blade. If it's out 1/64", a little adjustment here and there puts it where it should be.
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sweet sawdust wrote:

Mine is safely mounted on the overhead arm with the dust collection hose. I use it almost without exception just for that little edge it gives me.     chickenshit,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use mine when I'm doing an operation that it doesn't interfere with. I can use all the help I can get. I watched a guy ripping plywood one time stumble and lay his thumb on the blade when he tried to catch himself. Wouldn't have lost the thumb if the guard was in place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry John, I don't see the chickenshit. After all my years in the trades, I still have all my original equipment, less a little gray matter.
I think it is perfectly fine for the Saturday afternoon guy to take the guards off all his tools. The more fingers that are lopped off, hands that are damaged, legs that are hacked open simply translates into more work for someone like me.
I love to read about that wild man, that guy that is striking a blow for personal independence, that maverick that disables or takes off any safety feature on tool. I will stand next to him and wave my fist in the air "givin' to the the sombitch that tries to tell me what to do" with great gusto, knowing, sooner or later the odds are on my side.
A lapse of judgment, a moment of inattention, a miscalculation, a slip, working a when a little too tired, not understanding the tool's limitations (or theirs), too much in a hurry, overconfidence with the tools, mechanical failure (blade throws a tooth, router bit breaks, a belt breaks), an unexpected surprise (a knot shooting out of a piece of wood) and on and on with all the other things that go on when using a tool are the things I wait for. They bring me business.
Sadly, most home shop guys don't actually use their tools enough for the icy hand of the odds to finally be resting on their shoulder. An occasional bookcase or glider isn't usually going to cut it.
But on the other hand, if all the guards are taken off tools and there is no significant eye and dust protection, I figure my odds go way up for getting new business.
Sadly, I know I may have lost a customer for my woodworking skills when I go to their house for an estimate only to see most guards and guides for the tools in use as well as dust masks, and good lighting.
They admit that usually this is due to a self inflicted injury and they don't want to "take a chance on an accident anymore".
Weenies.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's where mine is also.
When I went to the 12/14" saw, the overhead guard was the next purchase.
The splitter is another pain in the ass, but I use that also.
jo4hn wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Michaels wrote:

... snip
These threads are always amusing, ranging from expressions of extreme fear of the smallest detail forgotten to seeing little wrong with what is being done or "that's the way I do it".
Ran across this bookmark at work today, it has a number of interesting items that, IMO, fall into both categories and between. Some of the pictures are just flat out so outrageous you wonder how anyone could come up with the idea to even attempt such a stunt and there are others that one looks at and thinks that it probably looks worse than it really is, particularly to the persons performing the work. I find some of the comments to be somewhat condescending and more or less paternalistic, while others are pointing out some obvious issues: <http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/photo/index.asp
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lee Michaels" wrote

him
About the only move that makes me involuntarily turn my head is when Norm runs 1 1/2" x 3/4" stock over a dado stack, with one hand, or both, pushing down over the blade.
I guess I'm just a sissy ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 5/14/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You ain't a sissy, my hand doesn't get anywhere NEAR the blade. I'd prefer to keep all my fingers intact - you know how hard it is to win a highpower match missing digits?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.