No ever told me..


it could be like this...After completing the saga with the bearings and arbor replacement(with a lot of help and encouragement from this group-thanks), while restoring a 61' Craftsman 100 table saw; I tuned it with a dial indicator and mounted a Forrest Woodworker 1 blade I had on hand. Had built a two runner crosscut sled, so put it on and made a cut.... What a revelation, prefect control of the cut and a finish that needs no sanding. In all my years, it appears I have never cut on a tuned saw (even a Craftsman) with a sharp blade. So much more of what I have read now begins to make sense and seems able to be done. Wow! So what happens with a really good saw? Boggles the mind.
David
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Genedoc wrote:
Wow!

glue-up quality rips!
Dave
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Hi David,
The same thing happens with a good saw. Just because it's better made and costs more doesn't mean it's immune to the problems that poor alignment and lack of maintenance cause. I've seen plenty of properly tuned and maintained low cost saws perform much better than high end machines. I'll add yours to that list.
Glad you've seen the light, welcome to the club!
Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com http://www.ts-aligner.com
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Genedoc wrote:

same thing... but it's easier to get there.
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