Niggling drill bit issue

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I've got a little John Nelson plan for a dinner-table-type folding candle-holder that's full of "Gotcha's".
One is candle size. I need to drill hard curly-maple for the base of the candles. Nelson sez to use candles with .5" base: I can't find any locally. But I've got some with 17/32" base.
I have no bits greater than .5". I don't *think* they make a 17/32" spade bit. I tried wiggling the .5" bit to enlarge the hole a little. It didn't work.
Do I have to special-order a 17/32" drill bit? Is there another way.
Apologies for the nickel/dime question.
Will
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Chuck it up in your lathe and cut the hole bigger.
No lathe - dowel (slit) and coarse sandpaper - grind the hole bigger (cheat and use small sanding drums for dremel, etc if you happen to have those in a size to suit.)
Or wiggle the 1/2" drill with greater effort. Or get in there with a router bit (maintain control, and practice on scrap if you have never tried that particular application of a router.) Roto-zip bits (no actual roto-zip tool required) provide yet another possible approach to side-cutting.
Or - modify the candles - they are wax, easy to cut/sand/heat and mold/scrape them down to 1/2 inch if you like.
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 16:34:46 -0500, Ecnerwal

No lathe. Each holder takes 6 candles. I'll make about 6 holders. All but 1 will be gifted. I don't want giftees to have to whittle candles. The router bit thing is, for me, an invitation to disaster.
Thx, Will
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Perfect excuse to buy a new tool.
But don't lathe the holder, chuck up the candles and have a go.
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wrote:

Buy a spade bit a little bigger than you need. Grind it to the size and tapper you need. Drill with regular care.
--
Jim in NC


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[...snip...]

With a template and a bearing guided bit, it could be done accurately and safely. On the template, drill a 1/2" hole and enlarge it with a dowel wrapped with sandpaper, or whatever.
With the holder, drill the holes to 1/2" to remove almost all the waste, place the template over the hole (with double stick tape, or make a jig to fix the holder into place) and enlarge the hole with the router.
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Heat the candle base and push it into 1/2" hole.
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I can't imagine 1/32" makes that much difference. Get a 9/16" bit, drill the hole, .... then wet the wood, to make it swell, if need be.
Sonny
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I would think that it would dry out and become loose again and add to that it may split as it dries again.
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easily. Any kind of knife with a short blade should do.
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On Jan 27, 5:20pm, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

I have carved candles before, got hot wax all over my hands, almost set my hair on fire...I must have done it wrong...
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 15:56:56 -0800, Robatoy wrote:

Your supposed to wear gloves and hold it away from your face :)
basilisk
--
A wink is as good as a nod to a blind horse

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On 1/27/2011 4:12 PM, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

I'd also suggest using a forstner bit rather than a spade bit to drill the holes. You'll get a much cleaner hole, particularly in curly maple.
Per the other suggestions, a 1/2" bit should work and you can get a 1/2" forstner at any retail hardware store.
~Mark.
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It doesn't fit. I tried 1/2 and 5/8" forstner. 1/2 is very noticibly too small, 5/8 is very noticibly too big.
Damn these odd-ball diameters!
Thx, Will
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Are metric bits available? I notice 17/32 is really close to 13.5mm, maybe a 13 or 14mm bit would work?
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/inches-mm-conversion-d_751.html
Puckdropper
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My thoughts too. When I did my router table I went to woodcraft and picked up a 13mm for my 1/2 bits. Made the fit perfect. 14mm might be the better alternative. I doubt the candles are perfect.
On 1/27/2011 6:47 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

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wrote:

for that reason. A strait hole, whether the candle fits it or not, will not be secure.
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wrote:

In which case a spade bit ground to a taper to match the candle should be the answer.
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Get a 9/16" (or bigger) spade bit and grind or file 1/64" (or more) from each side. Art
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wrote:

This would be my choice. I'd grind it to match the taper of the candles base as needed.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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