ni-cad batteries

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No Spam Here wrote:

I've heard that from a number of people, none of whom ever named the satellite in question. As someone who works with satellites on a daily basis I find the story improbable given the typical variations in orbital period due to the anisotropic nature of the orbital environment.
Can you provide some information that would allow a person interested in this to run the story down to its source?
--

FF


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Dave Hall wrote:

Perhaps this supposed confusion stems from differing interpretations of what it means to 'completely drain' a battery. Once there is a noticeable loss of speed or torque, can one not say that the battery is 'completely drained'?
Draining a NiCad BEYOND completely does irreversible damage to it for certain values of completely.
--

FF


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Plus how would the normal person drain them? and then not over drain them and cause them to reverse?
--
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And likely one or more of the cells will be weaker and get revese charged by the stonger cells. This will result in internal shorts and future rapid self discharge. Been there, done it! But don't just take my word for it, see what the manufacturers have to say:
http://www.panasonic.com/industrial/battery/oem/images/pdf/Panasonic_NiCd_Precautions.pdf
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On 14 Mar 2005 12:24:54 -0800, "hikinandbikin"

Any chance you can do the same for NiMH and its differences to NiCad? Info about charging NiMH with NiCad chargers would be informative too.
Thanks,
Thunder
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My battery vendor uses Cadex equipment to test and condition batteries. They have some great books about batteries on their website. If you have to pay the Batteries in a Portable World is a great primer without any of the Handyman myths.

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Speaking of Ni-Cd batteries, does anyone know if the Dewalt XPR batteries will work in a standard (non-XPR) drill? I've seen some deals on the 18v XPR batteries, and it seems like my drill's batteries got too cold over the winter.
Speaking of getting cold, is there a cure for the batteries getting cold? They seem to have lots of juice fresh out of the charger, but they seem to die quicker than they used to.
Clint

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According to DeWalt any of their batteries are interchangable as long as the voltage is the same (i.e the 18 volt standard, xr, xr2, xr+ and xrp batteries will operate in any DeWalt 18 volt cordless tool). It is my understanding that the batteries are all at least backwards compatible with the chargers (i.e the XRP battery can be charged on a charger that came with a xr battery).
Dave Hall
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well guys I have been in the RC Racing circuit for about 6 years now and probably have somewhere in the neighborhood of 1500 in batteries and I have two chargers @ approximately 650 a piece. and when NiCD's are used they are only run once per day then discharged and put away with a resistor keeping them completely dead 0.0 volts on the other hand if we run NiMh batteries then you can run them about 3-4 times per day and you NEVER discharge them completely (this can damage NiMh and LiON Cells) always store them with about 1.0-1.1 volts/cell or about 40-50% charge. well this is what most RC racers do for optimum cell performance. hope it helps. also reviving the cells with a high voltage for a short amount of time is common practice in RC called ZAPPING and they sell devices made for this. it is a high voltage spike (12 - 90 Volts DC) which lowers in internal cell resistance and increases capacity and cell voltage. this may or may not seem relevant but we run 3.6 A/hr packs and torture these things draining them in under 5 minutes 80 amp discharge rates. and this is what keeps them going. sorry for the long post
(P.S whenever my dewalt packs start losing performance I drain the battery completely and cycle it using one of my RC chargers works great)
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