Newbie to Veneering Needs Advice

Greetings Fellow Craftsmen! Your excellent advice would be highly appreciated.
I'm a weekend woodworker/hobbyist. Before I begin my latest project, I would like to seek some advice regarding veneers.
I want to build a few nesting tables (biggest tabletop being 2 by 3 feet) using plywood as the substrate for some maple veneer (not paperbacked, does that make it raw??). Then I plan to dye the tops black (using water-based dye), and finish the tables with shellac.
Just wondering what would be the best way to attach the veneer to the plywood. Keeping in mind that I don't have a veneer press or vacuum bag, would contact cement be a good solution, or just plain yellow glue, or maybe hide glue? Any other solutions? Will any of the adhesives react badly with the water-based dyes or shellac? I'm looking for a good bond that can handle some abuse (I do plan on using these tables a lot).
Again, any advice would be highly appreciated.
Jack
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My first question is if your going to paint it black, why veneer it in the first place when some good baltic beerch plywood would serve you just as well? Hide glue is the traditional glue to use for veneering as it is easy to use and repair. I personally don't like contact cement as it's a one shot glue. You have to get it right the first time or your screwed. If you are going to use veneer remember to veneer both sides of the plywood otherwise your piece will bow on you. Be sure to use a roller to press the veneer down on the plywood so that it makes good contact. Good luck, Ross

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jack Schumacher) wrote in message

Hot hide glue. The increased tack on cooling makes it easier to handle than other glues. Other glues either don't develop the tack you need (you can manage with anything if you have a vacuum bag setup), or they're just too quick (petrol-based contacts).
You'll also want a veneer hammer (you can make this) and a copy of Tage Frid's first book.
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Asumming that you don't have a vacuum bag system I would go with the "Hot iron technique"
Apply yellow glue to both the top of the substrate and the bottom of the veneer. Don't worry about the veneer curling or wrinkling as it will straighten out after the glue dries. After the glue has dried on both surfaces take a household iron set on "cotton" and make sure NOT to use any steam and simply iron the veneer onto the substrate.
You might want to place a paper shopping bag over the veneer to protect the iron from getting dirty. I have used this technique several times and it works well. Gene

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jack Schumacher) wrote in message

Just personal experience:
I've never used hide glue on a project and had any bubbles.
I've never used contact cement on a project and didn't have bubbles.
I'm actually quite happy with Franklin Liquid Hide Glue as long as the bottle is fresh.
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How about just buying some maple veneered plywood (readily available from most lumber suppliers)? Birch would probably work just as well if you're just going to dye it. There's no point in trying to do veneering on a project like this when you can get it factory done. Veneering to me means using speciality veneers that you want to use to highlight a piece. I've gone to a vacuum press for my veneering but prior to that, my method of choice was to use liquid hide glue for the adhesive. I'd then take my plywood, set it on top of a larger piece of ply on the floor. Then a larger piece on top (over some wax paper) with weight evenly distributed on it to "press" it. A couple of hundred pounds (dumbbells, sandbags, dog food, etc) works well. Key is to make sure your top piece is firmly pressing across the entire surface of your veneered piece - no warping or cupping of the top. For smaller pieces I've rarely had any trouble with that.
FWIW Gary in KC

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I sell an inexpensive vacuum pump system that would work perfect for your purpose. It is a low volume pump that can be run continuous The kit comes with pretty much everything you need to get started. http://www.roarockit.com Look under RC/Hobbyist Ted

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