Newbie Table Saw Safety Question

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Removing the blade guard and anti-kickback knife on a table saw seem like you are just asking for trouble. I realize this is the only way that you can use a dado blade in your saw though. Any thoughts on this. That big blade spinning around with no covering is very menacing looking. Anyone have experience with safer ways to make dado's & rabbits, like with a router?
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I have been woodworking seriously since 1978. I have yet to buy a set of dado blades.
You can use a router to cut your dado's.
Quick and accurate, take a sample of the wood that will fit the dado, set it on edge at the location that will receive the dado, clamp 2 boards on either side of the sample, remove the sample and use a router with a top bearing flush trim bit to route out the material between the two boards that you clamped.

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Yes it is dangerous! But a necessary evil. If you want some type of protection when using a dado set, then you really need an overhead guard. This will at least hopefully remind you not to put your hands near the blade. Another option is the GRR-Ripper. It can be used to provide further protection when working with exposed blades. http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/grr-ripper.htm
You can of course use a router, but it takes a lot longer and can be more hassle if you do not have a wide variety of router bits to get the width you need relatively quickly.
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 50 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Kreg Universal Bench Klamp - GRR-Ripper System & MJ Splitter - Spaceage Ceramic Bandsaw Guides - Infinity "Dadonator" Stacked Dado Set - GMC LS950SPJ Scrolling Jigsaw - Triton Powered Respirator ------------------------------------------------------------
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you
I bet you I can set up and route a single dado to "accurately" fit a particular board 3 times faster than you can set up dado blades and make the cut. Or a variety of widths with 1 bit.
I can show you a great router jig to cut a variety of any sized dados 1/2" or wider. The jig takes about 20 seconds to set up accurately.
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more
I agree that set up is easier with a router table, but actually cutting them on a table saw is so much faster and easier.
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toller wrote:

Hmm. I think you may have missed Leon's post a while back on ABPW - I saved the pix and posted them (with a drawing) at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/dado.html
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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Looking at that jig, I'm wondering if it would even be necessary to have a slot in the bottom boards? Wouldn't a simple bolt hole suffice and width adjustment be handled by skewing the setup? Worst case scenario, if the holes in the bottom boards didn't work out, then one could cut the needed slots. But, Leon's setup does look much cleaner. It's quite the neat jig actually. Thanks.
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Although the single hole and the skewing to change width is an interesting idea, the slots in the bottom enable the jig to change cutting widths and the top slots allow the user to tighten each side of the "T" to the edges of the board to receive the dado. This in effect squares the jig to the work and insures that the dado is cut at a 90 degree angle to the edge of the work.
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Nice and simple Leon. I want to make a pair.. One question - why is there no washer under the wingnut?
-Jack

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Thanks Jack
Actually there are washers under the wing nuts. The wing nuts, washers, and bolts are 5/16" sized. I wanted them to be finger friendly. If you look very closely at the top middle picture you can see the washers.
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and
Well, however it's constructed, it's a good practical jig if I've ever seen one. I'm sure there must be a commercial version similar in construction around somewhere, I'm just surprised I haven't seen one before. Maybe I need to get out more. :)
Hard to tell from the pictures. Is it made out of plywood to eliminate chances of warping, or did you consider it unnecessary to consider a particular type of wood to minimize the chances of it happening?
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seen
need
Thank you ... I'm getting all red in the face here... Shucks. I have never seen a comertial one quite this simple. I confess that I mixed about 5 or 6 ideas together about 4 years ago to end up with this design. Originally I used a guide bushing and common straight bit but with errors that can stack up there I later and by Earl Creels suggestion opted for the Top bearing flush trim bit. It seems that Morris may have still a better plan to use Aluminum angle stock to edge the guide arms and not use a flust trim bit at all. I am waithing for his details on this.

1/2" Baltic Birch 9 ply. I wanted it to be stable and last.
Since none of the dimensions are really critical as long as the clamps or bolts do not interfere with the path of the router I would advise to make the shorter "T" end of each half out of a wider piece of stock. Maybe 6" wide. I think mine are 3 or 4 inches. The router bit does cut in to the T as it exits the wood being cut. A wider T would IMHO add a little strength to the end of the T that the bolt goes through. The hardest part of making this jig was to insure that each half was assembled squarely.
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There used to be video of Pat Warner doing a similar procedure, on the FWW site. Made it pretty clear how this works safely.
That said, the appropriate manner of dado cutting certainly depends on the task(s) at hand. I'm glad to have several methods, and tools, available to me.
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

Exactly, I have seen it, he uses a square IIRC to align 1 guide board and uses the sample piece to locate the second board.

to
My jig has limits in that it will allow cross cut dado's up to about 24". If you want several grooves down the length of a 6' board the stacked dado blade might be a better choice.
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Leon wrote:

Neener: My routers came with guide/fences to make it even easier to do that. (-:
BTW: I added a pair of 3/4" x 3/4" aluminum angles to your jig design to allow me to use plain (no bearings) bits.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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My latest router that I bought 3 weeks ago came with a guide fence.

So, are you letting the shank of the bit rub up against the aluminum edges? Seems that would open up more capabilities of using much smaller bits for thin material also. How has that been holding up for you?
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Leon wrote:

The angles "confine" the router's base plate. I try hard not to let any metal (other than the collet) touch spinning router bits!
Other than for a couple of test cuts, I haven't used the jig much - nearly all of my joinery is done by the robot while I'm off doing something else. I've had the jig down more often for show 'n' tell than for use.
The spindle on my PC690 is concentric with its base plate; and the base plate is round. I think I may have lucked out because if either of those conditions weren't met, the angle approach wouldn't work very well - while your bushing approach will always work...
I've given some thought to making the position of the angles adjustable for different bit sizes - but that would require milling some fairly accurate slots in the aluminum and would probably only be practical for two bit diameters (although a step-shaped slot might work for 3/4", 1/2", 1/4", and 1/8".) I think it'd be easier to make single-size jigs with differently-positioned angles. If I break down and add a small mill to the shop I may have to experiment.
Smaller bits? I've routed thin mahogany veneer using a 1/32" bit on the 'bot; but just haven't even been tempted to try that freehand. I doubt I can advance the router smoothly enough by hand to avoid breaking 'em - it wouldn't take much.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I think I see here. I have never trusted the router base much more than the guide bushings. I do not particularly like to keep the router clocked in the same position to insure that the bit travels the same path.

Ah, that's cool.

Exactly. My 1617evs permits centering the base to the collet but I know that it could easily be knocked out of whack. I prefer the top bearing bit as it is always accurate. Using a sample board to set the slot width seems to work fine for me. I only use one size bit for all the width cuts 1/2" and larger.
On another note, Am I correct in assuming that you build solar panels? If you do, what kind?
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Leon wrote:

Really good ones! (-:
Sorry, I couldn't resist a bit of crass self-promotion. I build passive (unpowered) vertical panels that draw cool air from a structure at floor level, heat it up, and deliver it back into the structure six feet higher and (mid-winter, mid-day) 100F - 140F warmer.
I build two "lines" of panels: one that installs /in/ a vertical wall like a factory-built window unit; and another for (primarily) agricultural and warehouse use that mounts /on/ the outside wall. There're photos of both types scattered around my web site. Both lines operate in exactly the same way and use the same absorber/exchanger design.
There's a passive solar water heater in the works. The initial design is complete; but there are a couple of other projects in the queue ahead of it - I'm hoping to have a manufacturing prototype working by the end of September.
Right now, I'm trying to wind up a re-design of the in-wall version to sell in kit form (at the urging of some people in the UK.) It's been a challenge to anticipate all the ways the darned thing could be mis-assembled and to find simple ways to /force/ correct assembly. Why do you suppose it is that people are at their very most creative when they're screwing up? d-:
Essentially the panels are just wooden boxes with folded internal baffles, a shop built aluminum combination absorber and heat exchanger, and a really good polycarbonate solar glazing which is secured by (you've probably already guessed :-) aluminum angle. The in-wall type are built with 1" select pine and the on-wall with 2" fir.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I recall back in the early 80's those passive solar heaters were the in thing for helping the water heater in the Houston area. They came and went. Most of them were mounted on the roofs of houses and slowly disappeared. I cannot wait to see a more user friendly power solar panel. I have read that 150 square feet can generate enough power to almost supply my needs. There are a couple of companies near where I live that are building these power solar generators but are strictly commercial right now.
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