Newbie stain question.


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New to woodworking. Wanting to build a headboard and some furnature for my sons room. I have some white oak boards for face frames. What wood or plywood can I use for the caracass of a night stand and top for it that would stain the same way the white oak will. Same with a headboard. Is birch plywood the way to go? Seems I have never seen white oak plywood around here. It just says oak so I am not sure what kind of oak it is.
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Yes, typical Oak ply you will find at Home Depot, etc. will be Red Oak. You can get White Oak ply, plain, rift or quarter sawn. You just need to locate any lumber supplier that supplies the cabinet industry. As far as getting something to match, I think using Red Oak and playing with the stain color using different mixtures for each would be the best bet. You might try using some basic color for the Red Oak then use the same stain and mix in some other stain that is mostly orange to redden up the white Oak.Trial and error.
You might be able to find some wood that would be closer in color but the grain of Oak is very prominent and not much else matches. Another option is to go with a contrasting wood like Mahogany, Cherry or even Maple. It won't be too standard but could work out OK.
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Your best bet is to use the same wood for all exposed areas for the most even stain/finish. Ply or hardboard can be used for drawer bottoms and the backs of cabinets. For parts that don't show you can use poplar. If you are not sure the end result, take samples and stain/finish those before you begin a project.
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The oak plywood at the borg is generally red oak. You can find a stain color that looks good on that and then try to match it on the white oak by mixing in a little bit of stain with a red tint to it (e.g. cherry). It'll take a little experimentation.
The Hardwood Store (happens to be near me) has white oak plywood.
http://www.hardwoodstore.com/plywood.html
Since you claim to be a newbie, here's another piece of advice: oak is VERY porous. Be very careful when gluing, as any glue which gets on the wood will be absorbed into the pores and will block the stain from absorbing. If you can, stain the individual pieces before gluing. Otherwise, be extra careful to immediately clean up any glue drips with a damp cloth or sponge.
Josh
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Would it be ok to use solid wood throughout instead of plywood? Glueing togther white oak bards to form a pannel? Josh wrote:

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Depending on your location, might be cheaper than buying hardwood plywood to resaw the solid. Is for me on cherry and maple, close even on birch, and nobody makes black ash plywood....
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I always heard plywood was more stable. George wrote:

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Should have listened a bit longer. The reason for framing a floating panel is to keep out the dust without having to worry about wood movement.
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stryped wrote:

Sure. If you (ugh) stain it, the stain should look better too because just because ply is the same species it doesn't mean it would stain the same as the lumber you have.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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Yes. That's how I would likely do it. Jointing and edge gluing works just fine. Again, be careful about glue oozing out of the joint, though.
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