newbie saw queries


I want to cut up vs. pieces of plywood and chipboard for utility shelves (have the sides, need the shelves.)
The old (not old enough to be good I suspect) hand saw I was given is 1. dull and 2. unsuitable for the stuff I'm cutting.
I've seen mention of some Stanley JetCut saw. Will one of these live through cutting up to 35 - 40 feet total?
Power tools are out for vs. reasons. Also it felt good doing it, even with the old dull saw.
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Contrarian wrote:

Actually, the teeth fall out after 29 feet of cutting through 3/4" PB. <g>
dave
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Probably not. There are very few modern Stanley products that last as far as the shop door.
I'd look for a Sandvik, such as the ubiquitous "244". They're well-made hardpoint saws that do everything you need and are cheap enough to replace when needed. In the meantime they work pretty well and they certainly last well.
The reason for using an old saw, such as a Disston or something from pre-1960's Sheffield, is as much to do with the _need_ for sharpening it as the quality. You can set a saw like this up just how you want it for a particular task - another reason why you sharpen them yourself, not have them doctored.
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i hope you can get more pleasure from the woodworking.my farther is carpenter, and he teach me a lot by the woodworking,and makes a lot of dolls for me.i am so proud of my farther.
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The right saw would make it much more pleasant. Hand saw(s). Any suggestions?
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Learn to sharpen your old saw. It isn't difficult to learn. There are several sites, Disston, Stanley, etc. that I believe have sharpening tutorials. You'll need a vise, some scrap boards to sandwich the saw in the vise, and a triangular file. A saw set might be needed if it's in bad shape. Take it to a saw shop for setting if needed. I don't use mine once every ten years. Once learned, it is an enjoyable [and possibly profitable] pastime. Bugs
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Indeed I have thought of this, and found the library pages at http://www.vintagesaws.com
Although our acquaintance has been short, I have some affection for this old (but not perhaps *old enough* saw) But there's something of a regress involved, one needs boards of a certain length for a saw vise and this is the only saw I have and it doesn't cut well enough yet.
Let's pretend I don't have anything. I wish to cut up 5 - 7 boards in the near future. Any suggestions.
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Contrarian wrote:

I'd buy one of the Japanese saws with crosscut teeth on one side and rip teeth on the other.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Bugs wrote:

Hey, good idea. The top link in my GS (DAGS: stanley saw sharpening tutorial) has a link to:
    http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html
and Frid's TFTW has another howto in which he explains why he puts a rip shape on the teeth even of his crosscut saws.
er
--
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Contrarian wrote:

Look Here... http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1&p=42884
Course if you are like most people you will then spend more time browsing and imagining what you _could_ do with the right tools than actually doing anything...
The uncarved block...
I got the following -- a Ryoba Saw -- which is a very nice fine cut saw. Used it for hardwood, softwood, flush cutting etc. It is a _pull_ saw -- which allows good control with very little power. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32941&cat=1,42884,42896
General page for Ryoba Saws http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=42896&cat=1,42884
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Right now I don't know enough about what all the tools do.

This is what I got today! A pull saw. 9 1/2 inch Ryoba from Garrett Wade. And cut up 5 times tonight what I did Sunday. With a tool that will pay for itself in really soon*. And I didn't get it at a Home Depot !
I need to work a bit on keeping the lines I cut straight though. But what I did is fine for the intended use.
Will look at your other links when I can, right now I see only text.
Thanks all!
* Some "hardware" stores sell prefab ?chipboard shelves for about $15.00 - $20.00 USD. Using nice new clean (but free) wood/plywood, with only the cost of the saw, it will soon pay for itself. (The prefab stuff is the wrong color usually and I need to get paint anyway)
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