Newbie router question

In an attempt to broaden by woodworking skills, I bought a PC 690LR router. . My question is specifically about this router. On the bottom, there is a black plastic base. I attempted to use a 1/4 roundover bit today, but had to remove the black plastic base first before I could use the bit. What is the black plastic base used for?
Thank you for your time and patience.
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More info needed but typically the black base helps to keep the metal base of router from scratching your work.
Now if what you are talking about is simply a cover to protect the regular black plastic base you may want to pitch it.
Or you need to buy bits with longer shanks. Or simply adjust the base higher up on the router motor.
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The black plastic base is to allow the router to slide and not scratch a wood surface. There is a recessed "pocket" in that black plastic base plate made to hold porter cable type guide collars. I can't imagine using the router without the plastic base. I have an assortment of Lexan base plates with different shapes and different size center holes for larger router bits. You can buy extra black plastic base plates.
Do you intend to use the router free hand or mount it upside down in a table? Most table mount systems would remove the black plastic and mount the base to a plate of some type.
It is not unusual to need to cut a larger hole in a base plate to accommodate a larger bit, but I do think you want to keep the base plate as close to the size of the bit as possible.
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The Black plastic disk is one of two that comes with the router. If you look closely, the center whole in the clear base should accommodate a much larger bit. This is the base you will use mist often. However, when you want to make dovetails, or something else that requires an additional collar, the black base is needed. The center hole accepts the collar so the bit doesn't rub the jig.

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Thank you to all who responded. Yes, I was missing the clear base which would allow the bit enough clearance. . Also made my first rookie mistake...doing a bullnose...I am sure you all know what happened...Thanks again.

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Why did you have to remove the plastic base? Was the bit too large to fit through the center hole? Was the bit not long enough for it to present enough profile through the base?
I can't imagine a 1/4" roundover bit being too large to fit though the default hole size of the PC 690.
If the bit seems too short, perhaps the motor is not seated at the correct depth in the base. Check the documentation that came with the router.
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JohnnyC wrote:

In addition to the comments from others, don't push the bit so far into the collet as to bottom it out. You need bit shank within the full collet but there is usually a *LOT* of addtional space beyond the collet and if you push the bit in all the way it will leave very little cutting space.
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Would not remove the subbase to install a cutter. There is an easier way to resolve this cutter hole/subbase issue. See link below: http://patwarner.com/round_subbase.html ********************************************************************8

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