newbie questions

I'm new to woodworking can someone help me out here? I can repay you by answering your questions about brewing your own beer or flying r/c aircraft!
I have a question about two terms that I have seen used here. First, what exactly do the numbers 8/4 or 6/4 refer to when talking about wood. Second, what exactly is resawn wood?
Thanks
HomeBrewer
http://home.earthlink.net/~t3e871/index.html www.rcparkflyers.com Remove the xxx to reply!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
8/4 means lumber that has been sawn eight quarters of an inch thick or 2 inches, 6/4 means 1 1/2 inch thick or six quarters.
Resawn wood is boards that are run through a band saw in order to make a larger number of thinner boards. Say take a 2 inch thick board and saw it into a number of 1/8 inch veneers. A lot of woodworkers to this to glue them back together and bend them on a form in order to make a curved piece such as a chair back.
KY
--

http://users.adelphia.net/~kyhighland


"HomeBrewer" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What kind of beers do you brew?
I haven't brewed in about a year since I started getting into woodworking (sigh). I think my yeast cultures in the fridge are spoiled by now.
I use to brew a lot of porters and stouts. Your post got me thinking about it again. I need to get a batch going soon!

aircraft!
Second,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I brew a little of everything. My favorites are wheats. I have the itch to bew another batch soon, also.
I got another question. I have a lot of plans for different projects. Some have a material list and are not clear on exact sizes of the boards. I know 2x4's are actually 1.5x3.5 and 4x4's are 3.5x3.5. Is there some kind of standard for hardwood boards? If I go to a lumber yard and ask for a 2x6 red oak, is it going to be 1.5x5.5? I'm confused on this.
--
HomeBrewer

http://home.earthlink.net/~t3e871/index.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Homebrewer,
The sizes quoted are the nominal sawn sizes. If you buy rough timber, this is the size you'll get. If you want your lumber ready-planed, the mill has to take this rough-sawn stuff and plane it all round, so you lose the amount which has been planed off, making your 4x2s significantly smaller.
If you want your lumber to end up exactly 4 x 2 when planed then, typically, the mill will machine the next larger stock size down to 4 x 2 for you. Obviously, they'll charge you for the larger size and may also add a machining fee.
Cheers
Frank
Cheers,
Frank

by
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

red
If you pop into Lowes or Home Depot and run to their hardwood selection, you'll find oak and maple in the sizes you're familiar with - a 1x6, a 1x8, etc. It's more expensive that a trip to a real hardwood store.
For hardwoods, the standard measurement is something called a Board Foot. Which, I'm just beginning to understand. But have survived about a year without a complete grasp.
When you visit a hardwood store, you'll find some that stock "rough" and others that stock "S3S" (or S2S, and a half-dozen permutations). If you don't have a thickness planer and don't have a jointer - you're likely best served by looking for wood that's "S3S" (Surfaced 3 sides).
From S3S wood - you can bing along a tape measure and just ignore the "quarters" and "board feet" issues and pull boards that are the size you need. Where I often shop, Paxton's, 4/4 S3S stock is a shade over 3/4" thick and stocked in various widths and lengths.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A man after my own heart! What kind of rc planes ya fly Mr. Brewer?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.