Newbie question on joinery

Has anyone tried Kreg Pocket Hole Systems? I received a link from FreePlans subscription about this system.
Does it substitute the biscuit joining system? Is it a good alternative? I haven't purchased a biscuit joiner and would like to know. This is the link that they sent me: http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/ezine/ad_kreg97.cfm
There's a page in there with videos: http://www.kregtool.com/Kreg_jig_virtual_tradeshow.asp
(Sorry if my question is out of place but when I said newbie, I meant very newbie.) Thanks
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"MOE" wrote in message

Do a Goggle search on the forum archives. You'll find that lots of folks use pocket hole joinery where it is appropriate and there will be a ton of previous discussion.
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I haven't, but ohter here have and like it.

It is a good substitute for face frames and certain types of joinery, but it is not a substitute for joining panels where biscuits are good for alignment.
Or you can be a true traditionalist and scoff at both. Mortise and tenon would be the traditional joint for a face frame.
Every means of joinery has a place where it excels, places where it is as good as anything, places where it is wrong. Don't take the approach that since you have a pocket screw systems (Kreg or otherwise) that you don't need anything esle because you will.

No need to apologize. There are various levels of skill here and most of us are still learning from others. Over time you will define and perhaps re-define what you want to do. I've yet to cut a dovetail while others won't do drawers any other way. Some of us are steeped in traditions, others want the newest technology. Some will take all day to make a joint and get lots of satisfaction because it is done the "right" way. Others will zip out a joint and take satisfaction that it will work but they save a couple of hours. Over time you will find the journey to be at least as important as the destination. Enjoy it. Ed
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Yes, it is considered by most to be the gold standard of hobbiest pocket hole jigs. I own one and it rocks.

*in some cases*
Is it a good alternative?
That depends. It is a very effective, quick simple and *ugly* joint. It really shines for face frame construction. But I would not use it where it shows. I would consider PH joinery unacceptable for cabinet door construction, but biscuits, although not my first choice, are acceptable IMHO.
DAGS; it's not the first time this question has been addressed.

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I have two biscuit joiners and bought the Kreg jig about 5 years ago. The Kreg jig has just about put the biscuit joiner out of business in my shop. If you can hide the holes it works great. It will not be a good substitute if you do not want to see evidence of the pocket holes. Very hard to beat for face frames on cabinets.
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Thanks to everyone for a quick reply. Very enlightening. Thanks again. Moe

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My opinion, and I use both traditional joinery, biscuits, and pocket hole joinery, is, like every other type and method of jointing, it has it's place.
I consider them great for carcass building and a close tie with biscuits for face frame making, I think biscuits are faster and, with some woods, splitting can be a problem with pocket screws but not biscuits. I would not use them in a situation where structural strength to resist racking was needed.
That's my take
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Mike G.
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wrote:

I don't have a Kreg pocket jig (yet), but this is an ideal way to connect two sheets of wood or ply edge-to-edge when one side is not to be shown. This is the (big) disadvantage of pocket holes--the large ugly oval. Biscuit joinery is completely unseen and provides alignment, unlike pocket hole joinery.
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Review of the Kreg K2000 here: http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/kregk2000.htm
Might answer some of your questions.
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 50 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Infinity "Dadonator" Stacked Dado Set - GMC LS950SPJ Scrolling Jigsaw - Triton Powered Respirator - Veritas Power Tool Guide - Ryobi 6" Grinder/Stand Combo - Band Saw Handbook ------------------------------------------------------------
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MOE wrote:

Moe...
They serve different purposes. Biscuits are gee-whiz alignment devices, while pocket joinery provides significant structural strength (I posted pictures to news:alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking earlier today of a workbench built /only/ using pocket hole joinery).
I have, and use both.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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Try a Google search on this group.

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